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On this board we don’t actually discuss the content of the magazine that often, but I would just like to say I have been very pleased so far in 2012 and the content and quality seems to be on the rise. There have been nice write ups on the latest vintages in Bordeaux, Piedmont, Burgundy, Rioja and Rhone amongst others and nice travel guides to Barbaresco, Sonoma and Rioja to name a few. Also liked the whiskey mag and the one about Danny Meyer.

I think part of the reason for the quality increase is Molesworth covering Bordeaux and Sanderson covering Italy. Both are a major upgrade over Suckling IMO. I have also really liked the articles on some of the lesser know regions and hope that trend continues. Of course anything travel and restaurant related usually is a must read for me and this year did not disappoint. I was kind of going the other way on the mag a couple of years ago, but they have won me back for sure.

One change I would like to see is another point of view on pinot and rhone varietals in CA. I pretty much ignore WS when it comes to these areas. I think Galloni at the WA is doing an awesome job pointing out wines in CA made in a more restrained style and wish someone at WS had similar tastes. Not saying to axe Laube, but maybe just add some young blood looking for new wines made in that style which seems to continue to gain in popularity amongst the sea of fruit bombs in CA. I would also ditch the value mag that seems to come out every year, but I’m probably not the target audience for that one.

Anyone else pleased with the mag this year? Any proposed changes?
 
Posts: 6561 | Location: OC, CA  | Registered: Aug 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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More photos of women in bikinis.
 
Posts: 6526 | Location: Palm Beach | Registered: Nov 08, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I too am pleased.
I just renewed today for a couple more years.
I liked the recent article on Italy, and I liked the article in the current issue on Alsace. Plus, the Napa information was good.
I do think they should have a senior citizen discount......as I get close to 60, I realize there isn't much point in reading about wines that will not be "ready" for 25 yrs.


99% of lawyers give the rest of us a bad name.
 
Posts: 7190 | Location: Baltimore, MD | Registered: Feb 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've always enjoyed the magazine content with the exception of the issues on Value, Top 10, and Restaurant Awards.

Even with the travel articles on wine regions, it does tend to get old reading about the same place every year or every two years.

I do like reading about other people's cellars who are not gazillionaires. I think that's something that I've noticed this past year.

As for improvements, I like to see a real Top 10 or Top 20 regardless of price or availability. You have enough diverse opinions and palates that DRC or a First Growth would not necessarily dominate each year.
 
Posts: 5181 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: Aug 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I do like reading about other people's cellars who are not gazillionaires.


+1

It's neat to see both the cellars from a aesthetic (the actual structures) and content aspect.


Jim
That's, RedLoverJim to you
 
Posts: 97 | Location: Fort Worth, TX | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Funny.

I have zero interest in reading about someone else's cellar. It's like reading about their cupboards or closets. And if I wanted a travel magazine, I'd read one, but I don't care to read about travel either. At least insofar as it's about someone's favorite restaurants and sites.

But I do like reading about wine and the various regions and they've done some really nice work with some of the recent articles.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2665 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
More photos of women in bikinis.

LOL Yes, Wine Spectator: The Swimsuit Edition.


***********
Turkey bacon is the reason I have trust issues.
 
Posts: 6843 | Location: Everett, WA | Registered: Mar 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Every year I receive a subscription from my in-laws, because they know I like wine. Every year I wish they'd spend the money in some other way. Historically Matt Kramer's single page has been the only thing I really cared about in a given issue. I will say that some things in the past year have seemed to improve a bit. The most recent issue was a disappointment. The focus on Pritchard Hill was unnecessary and came at the expense of more information on the vintage as a whole. Of course, Napa in general isn't really so much my thing. I think the big thing we've seen in the past year or two (though I almost pause b/c this topic can be incendiary) is a slight backing down from huge scaled, internationally styled wines, and a slight acknowledgement of more traditional styles. The Rioja article is a good example. I feel that four years ago even we'd have seen an article triumphing the modernists, instead of one that focused quite a bit (and quite rightly) on LdH.
 
Posts: 477 | Registered: Mar 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Less travel, top 100, values and resturant awards. I could care less about anyones cellars and the thick wood table and dangling lights.

Cover more areas. Think CA is a bit over done.

Laube is a waste. Too old, entrenched, and a shill for Napa. Need new blood.

Biggest waste if the Napa phone app. WTF who cares, buy a map, or read these threads. A good app would be France, Italy etc. List the wineries, maps etc.

yeah a few bathing beauties would go a long ways. Maybe the need to hold a wine glass to be in WS.


Live simply, Laugh often, Wine a lot!!!
 
Posts: 6416 | Location: Palm Beach Gardens FL | Registered: Nov 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I enjoy the travel articles as much as the wine reviews. A good bit of our travel is to wine producing areas and I find it helpful, though I've gotten more good advice from the members of this forum.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 37006 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I enjoy the travel articles as much as the wine reviews. A good bit of our travel is to wine producing areas and I find it helpful, though I've gotten more good advice from the members of this forum.
I agree. I used their Rioja guide from a couple of years ago and the couple of restaurants we tried based on that travel guide were fantastic. What I liked most about it was the restaurants were full of locals and not tourists. I think they do a great job with the travel part of the mag.
 
Posts: 6561 | Location: OC, CA  | Registered: Aug 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you for your comments on the print edition of Wine Spectator. I find both the compliments and the criticisms very helpful. We are always trying to satisfy our readers' interests, and with 400,000 subscribers (and 3.5 million readers), that means a broad range of topics and story content. We are always evolving, and our goal is to reflect with accuracy and expertise the rapidly-changing world of wine. Let us know when we succeed, and when we miss the mark.
 
Posts: 297 | Registered: Dec 11, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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unless I missed a recent article, I would love to see a more in depth look at the Santa Cruz Mountains. I would also like to see more retrospective tastings (and for Bordeaux - a greater diversity at the 10 year mark).

I would also like to see a little more writing on not just the art of wine making, but why certain choices are made - in the vineyard and in the cellar. maybe a Wine making 101 class - on these boards Stefaniawine does that for us.....

Thanks,

G
 
Posts: 2104 | Location: Nashville, TN | Registered: Feb 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by thirsty man:
I would also like to see more retrospective tastings.



YES! YES!

I still subscribe and enjoy perusing the magazine.

I thought WS had jumped the shark a year or so ago when they had the cover featuring "value" second wines like Forts de Latour at over $300 per bottle. What were they thinking??? But overall, I think it's still a decent magazine.

I am questioning, however, the inclusion of Schild Shiraz in the "Smart Buys" section of the recent issue--they didn't specify which bottling I'm supposed to look for this time around...


Stay thirsty my friends.
 
Posts: 3186 | Location: Saginaw, MI | Registered: Mar 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have enjoyed the magazine for years. It's beautifully photographed, has chic ads, consistent ratings (for good or for bad, but I appreciate the blind tasting methodology) and I enjoy the wine travel articles.

I'd like to see some more Tom Matthews actually. He's taught me to let my Spanish alone until they are aged and he has led me to some elegant BBQ zins.

An article about wine blogs (this fantabulous forum for instance) or Cellar Tracker (this
especially) is way overdue. There are a lot of people here who have a lot to teach and it is a wonderful lead back to your site (to which I already subscribe).

By the way, triple charging for the new app and the same info (again, again, again) for the same/slightly different content is bogus. My $2.99, which I'm keeping.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Swade,
 
Posts: 131 | Location: Milwaukee, WI | Registered: Dec 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I enjoy the travel articles as much as the wine reviews. A good bit of our travel is to wine producing areas and I find it helpful, though I've gotten more good advice from the members of this forum.
I agree. I used their Rioja guide from a couple of years ago and the couple of restaurants we tried based on that travel guide were fantastic. What I liked most about it was the restaurants were full of locals and not tourists. I think they do a great job with the travel part of the mag.


+1
 
Posts: 30284 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Would love to see more coverage of wine regions in the USA OUTSIDE of the west coast. There is plenty of great wines being made outside of the left coast, and with new hydrids and better technology people have more choices than gawd awful Chardonnay. To me it's not about the wines being better or equal to the west coast, but it's something different, interesting and there is a lot of wineries out there growing many different varietals. Also, i love reading about wines being made in different places outside of the USA, in places like Lebanon, Israel, Turkey, Hungary and so on.....

Big fan of Molesworth!! Love his blog on the Finger Lakes.
 
Posts: 2207 | Location: Chicago Suburbs | Registered: Oct 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would like more structured tasting articles (the rioja one was pretty good) where the wrtiter talks about the wines in more than just a tasting note.

As for the "Cellars" feature, I like them. I would like all of the major writers to be the feature of them one at a time as well. Lets get a look at Moleworth's or Laube's cellar and see what is there and why.

Also a huge +1 to more retrospectives. I'd love a 2000 bordeaux one.

And I'd love to see an issue dedicated to ageing wine. Go region by region with how they age, dumb phases, rule of thumbs. Taste new, adolecent, middle aged and old with tasting notes from both the regional writer and a random other writer from the staff to see the differences in palate.


Looking forward to those mags of '08 Salon.
 
Posts: 2457 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
More photos of women in bikinis.

LOL Yes, Wine Spectator: The Swimsuit Edition.


Where the heck is Cellar Fiend these days anyway?


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1386 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like khmark7's reply.

I subscribed to a few wine magazines and by the 3rd or 4th issue I get tired of them. (Shrugs Shoulders)

p.s. has WS done any features on Greece?
 
Posts: 8762 | Location: North CA | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Ed Bowers [i.e. FlWino]:
Less travel, top 100, values and resturant awards. I could care less about anyones cellars and the thick wood table and dangling lights.

Cover more areas. Think CA is a bit over done.

Laube is a waste. Too old, entrenched, and a shill for Napa. Need new blood.

Biggest waste if the Napa phone app. WTF who cares, buy a map, or read these threads. A good app would be France, Italy etc. List the wineries, maps etc.

yeah a few bathing beauties would go a long ways. Maybe the need to hold a wine glass to be in WS.


+1, the bathing beauties could always be photographed drinking the wine out of the bikini tops


WSET Adv
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Posts: 411 | Location: United Kingdom | Registered: Mar 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice to see napa cabs rated and shown in the mag.


www.twincitieswinetasting.com
 
Posts: 451 | Location: Minneapolis | Registered: Jan 22, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I agree that WS content has improved, especially in the area that interests me the most: Italian wine. You can see a difference post-Suckling, as some of the big bias towards certain producers is starting to disappear. For example, Brunello Biondi Santi 1997 was judged as "tired and acidic" (WS July 2002) on release, while the 2006 Riserva is now receiving 97 points. Recognizing the value of Biondi Santi, and other classic producers, is a big positive step in my view and corrects an inexplicable anomaly.
There is still some work to be done though, as I read here http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/47512 that: "Tancredi Biondi-Santi, the fifth generation of his family and still finishing his viticultural studies, shined the spotlight on the clonal selection for the estate’s Brunello; BBS-11, which can only be used by Biondi-Santi, was developed for its resistance to the phylloxera louse."
It's the rootstock that is resistant to phylloxera, not the clone. As explained in Kerin O'Keefe book Brunello di Montalcino, University of California Press discussed in another thread http://forums.winespectator.co...47004532#9547004532, the research that led to BBS 11 was to identify and select the best Sangiovese vines that had decades and possibly centuries to adapt to Montalcino terroir. Once clones are registered they become "open source", i.e. anybody can use BBS 11 or any other registered clone simply by asking specialized nurseries cuttings ready to be planted. Col d'Orcia, Banfi and Il Poggione also generously shared their research with other producers by registering several Sangiovese clones.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Simonbeve,
 
Posts: 16 | Registered: Jun 06, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
More photos of women in bikinis.


I'm going to go with the old Stephon Marbury and Kevin Garnett ESPN ad and suggest, "All nude, tastefully done. But definitely, all nude."

Sorry, can't find a link to the video.


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"What is man, when you come to think upon him, but a minutely set, ingenious machine for turning, with infinite artfulness, the red wine of Shiraz into urine?" -Isak Dinesen
 
Posts: 1294 | Location: Chico, CA | Registered: May 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Simonbeve:
http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/47512 that: "Tancredi Biondi-Santi, the fifth generation of his family and still finishing his viticultural studies, shined the spotlight on the clonal selection for the estate’s Brunello; BBS-11, which can only be used by Biondi-Santi, was developed for its resistance to the phylloxera louse."
It's the rootstock that is resistant to phylloxera, not the clone. As explained in Kerin O'Keefe book Brunello di Montalcino, University of California Press discussed in another thread http://forums.winespectator.co...47004532#9547004532, the research that led to BBS 11 was to identify and select the best Sangiovese vines that had decades and possibly centuries to adapt to Montalcino terroir. Once clones are registered they become "open source", i.e. anybody can use BBS 11 or any other registered clone simply by asking specialized nurseries cuttings ready to be planted. Col d'Orcia, Banfi and Il Poggione also generously shared their research with other producers by registering several Sangiovese clones.


The sale of vine cuttings is highly regulated in the EU and nurseries can only sell registered clones, each member nation has its own national register. I checked in Italy's National register of vines and BBS 11 has been registered in 1978. More than generosity on the part of producers sharing their research on clones, it's a practical necessity of having large specialized nurseries being allowed to work on the propagation of the vines giving them in large numbers when producers need them.
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Amsterdam | Registered: Oct 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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