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The unthinkable has happened. Had a pipe burst on 2nd floor of house and gravity being a bi%^& water found its way into one of my wine cellar walls. Had about a 15 minute rainfull from 1st floor in to my laundry room/cellar area. Water beaded down the outside wall of wine cellar where it puddled. Water appears to have seeped in from puddle from cement floor meets cellar wall. Only about 6 ounces of water on concrete wall of cellar (like a dropped a glass of water). Exterior wall shows a little water staining from where water was running down it. Had more liquid on floor when I dropped a bottle of wine last year (the 71 petrus story)

Do I remove wall, rip out insulation and vapor barrier to replace vapor barrier and insulation? IS there a way of testing if insulation/vapor barrier was impacted from water? Any insight/help for this is greatly appreciated.
 
Posts: 791 | Location: Long Island, NY | Registered: Jul 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by differentdave:
The unthinkable has happened. Had a pipe burst on 2nd floor of house and gravity being a bi%^& water found its way into one of my wine cellar walls. Had about a 15 minute rainfull from 1st floor in to my laundry room/cellar area. Water beaded down the outside wall of wine cellar where it puddled. Water appears to have seeped in from puddle from cement floor meets cellar wall. Only about 6 ounces of water on concrete wall of cellar (like a dropped a glass of water). Exterior wall shows a little water staining from where water was running down it. Had more liquid on floor when I dropped a bottle of wine last year (the 71 petrus story)

Do I remove wall, rip out insulation and vapor barrier to replace vapor barrier and insulation? IS there a way of testing if insulation/vapor barrier was impacted from water? Any insight/help for this is greatly appreciated.


i'd wait for it to dry (it's winter so it shouldn't be that bad)

short answer no,

the way i would do it is to knock out a dry wall since it's cheap to replace then assess to see if the water really soaked through.

normally water will soak through regardless which is why you have the vapor barrier, the cellar is more moist than the outside.

i'd worry about your pipes!


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Posts: 12229 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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sounds like we need to have another party to check in on the wines. Seems you've had a bad run of water related issues the past few months. I'm no expert, but I'd probably do what g-man mentioned, cut out some exploratory pieces of drywall and see what's what. I had a pipe burst above my garage one winter and had about 20 min or so of water saturate the space above the drywall. In the end had a plumber come out fix the pipe and a drywall guy come out, replace the insulation and about 2 pieces of drywall. No muss no fuss. I filed a homeowners claim.
 
Posts: 3169 | Location: ATL | Registered: Mar 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by differentdave:
The unthinkable has happened. Had a pipe burst on 2nd floor of house and gravity being a bi%^& water found its way into one of my wine cellar walls. Had about a 15 minute rainfull from 1st floor in to my laundry room/cellar area. Water beaded down the outside wall of wine cellar where it puddled. Water appears to have seeped in from puddle from cement floor meets cellar wall. Only about 6 ounces of water on concrete wall of cellar (like a dropped a glass of water). Exterior wall shows a little water staining from where water was running down it. Had more liquid on floor when I dropped a bottle of wine last year (the 71 petrus story)

Do I remove wall, rip out insulation and vapor barrier to replace vapor barrier and insulation? IS there a way of testing if insulation/vapor barrier was impacted from water? Any insight/help for this is greatly appreciated.


Dave,

A lot of questions here. I'm sorry this happened.

First, do NOT make an insurance claim until you know the dollar amount. Any and all water claims will come back to bite you when you sell the house, and I mean bite.

Insulation.. is it fiberglass? If so, it is ruined forever and mildew is a problem from this day forward. AGAIN, do not make a claim until you have more information.

Without knowing more about the construction of you home, hard to say much more. The bottom 6" at the least of your drywall will have to be replaced.

It may be best if we talked on the phone.
 
Posts: 30175 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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may be a tad late as I contacted insurance company regarding incident when it happened. NO adjuster as of yet. I have the rXX (r23 I forgot) insulation non fiberglass in the 2 walls which are not cement foundation walls. wall of cellar were not soaked but more like rained on.
Between damage to cellar, laundry room area next to cellar, bathroom above the cellar plus insulation, walls, ceilings, floors, etc I can not imagine not filing a claim. Wife and I plan to live here for long haul and imagine by the time we will sell, it will be a knock down and rebuild by that point.
DOnt wanna put number on forum so if you email me at differentdave at yahoo dot com i will reply will cell number. THanks everyone and when are you coming back around to NY w+a?
 
Posts: 791 | Location: Long Island, NY | Registered: Jul 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by differentdave:
The unthinkable has happened. Had a pipe burst on 2nd floor of house


sorry to hear this, what a pain. Things like this are a nightmare - how did it happen?


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Posts: 3488 | Location: NW Suburbs of Chicago | Registered: Aug 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by differentdave:
may be a tad late as I contacted insurance company regarding incident when it happened. NO adjuster as of yet. I have the rXX (r23 I forgot) insulation non fiberglass in the 2 walls which are not cement foundation walls. wall of cellar were not soaked but more like rained on.
Between damage to cellar, laundry room area next to cellar, bathroom above the cellar plus insulation, walls, ceilings, floors, etc I can not imagine not filing a claim. Wife and I plan to live here for long haul and imagine by the time we will sell, it will be a knock down and rebuild by that point.
DOnt wanna put number on forum so if you email me at differentdave at yahoo dot com i will reply will cell number. THanks everyone and when are you coming back around to NY w+a?


Since you have other damages in other areas and I would have them to tear down the walls and replace all the insulation regardless. Better be safe than sorry.


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Posts: 2080 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Feb 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by aav28:
quote:
Originally posted by differentdave:
may be a tad late as I contacted insurance company regarding incident when it happened. NO adjuster as of yet. I have the rXX (r23 I forgot) insulation non fiberglass in the 2 walls which are not cement foundation walls. wall of cellar were not soaked but more like rained on.
Between damage to cellar, laundry room area next to cellar, bathroom above the cellar plus insulation, walls, ceilings, floors, etc I can not imagine not filing a claim. Wife and I plan to live here for long haul and imagine by the time we will sell, it will be a knock down and rebuild by that point.
DOnt wanna put number on forum so if you email me at differentdave at yahoo dot com i will reply will cell number. THanks everyone and when are you coming back around to NY w+a?


Since you have other damages in other areas and I would have them to tear down the walls and replace all the insulation regardless. Better be safe than sorry.


+1 For all reasons listed above. I did an early stint in my career in insurance claims. Better to repair water damage to it's full extent now, than deal with mold later. Paying yourself (vs. insurance claim) may be more expensive now but more economical in the long run.
 
Posts: 1923 | Location: Etobicoke (Toronto burb) | Registered: Apr 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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VinCentric is dead-on: you think a water damage claim is bad? If you have mold, forget it. W+A is on the right track in that the common approach when water damage occurs, if you catch it quickly is:
- Cut-out the bottom 24" of drywall
- Remove any wet/soaked insulation
- place commercial dryers in the space and run for 3-5 days straight
- Pro's will have a tool/device that when pointed at the wall measures the moisture content of the wall. This enables them to determine where to cut-out drywall, etc.

And yes, if it sounds like I have some experience in this, I do. 12 years in the plumbing/building industry (water/plumbing-related) AND I had a similar water-related accident in my own home (1,500 gallons...$30K in damages)

Having a remediated water damage claim (years old) beats the heck out of dealing with mold. Bad stuff there...


In the United States, anyone can be President. That's the problem!
 
Posts: 1115 | Location: Minneapolis, MN | Registered: Mar 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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welp if yer gonna take it downa nd rebuild, now's a good time to amke it bigger ;-)


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Posts: 12229 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi there, I am new to the forum and felt compelled to sign up after reading this thread.

I had a water damage claim very similar to the situation described. I involved my insurer who sent over a restoration company who used commercial dryers. Long story short, I was out of town when all of this happened, my father (I asked him to assist my better half with the water damage) asked the resto company if my collection should be removed from the home (I have a climate controlled cellar in my basement like many of you).

He was told "no" that the cooling system would be ok to protect the wine. Not so much, the commercial dryers overheated the cooling system, frying it. 550 bottles of wine were destroyed in the process as the house got so hot, the wine was cooked. I was insured for all of this and got a big fat cheque, but lost a lot of good bottles.

Be very careful with your situation and consider moving your collection out of the house if you are going to bring in those commercial dryers........

Good luck!

chris
 
Posts: 3 | Location: vancouver, bc | Registered: Jan 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by chrisvanvino:
Hi there, I am new to the forum and felt compelled to sign up after reading this thread.

I had a water damage claim very similar to the situation described. I involved my insurer who sent over a restoration company who used commercial dryers. Long story short, I was out of town when all of this happened, my father (I asked him to assist my better half with the water damage) asked the resto company if my collection should be removed from the home (I have a climate controlled cellar in my basement like many of you).

He was told "no" that the cooling system would be ok to protect the wine. Not so much, the commercial dryers overheated the cooling system, frying it. 550 bottles of wine were destroyed in the process as the house got so hot, the wine was cooked. I was insured for all of this and got a big fat cheque, but lost a lot of good bottles.

Be very careful with your situation and consider moving your collection out of the house if you are going to bring in those commercial dryers........

Good luck!

chris


i'm uhh I short of words to describe but WTF did use as "commercail dryers" that fried your wines


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Posts: 12229 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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G-Man. the dryers generate heat. The house was locked up for 24 hours so they could dry out the water that primarily accumulated a level up on hard wood floor. There was some water damage in the basement so dryers were put down there as well.

The house turned into a blast furnace and hence the wine got cooked.

Just bad luck on my part that I would not want to happen to anyone else.

Thanks,

chris
 
Posts: 3 | Location: vancouver, bc | Registered: Jan 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by chrisvanvino:
G-Man. the dryers generate heat. The house was locked up for 24 hours so they could dry out the water that primarily accumulated a level up on hard wood floor. There was some water damage in the basement so dryers were put down there as well.

The house turned into a blast furnace and hence the wine got cooked.

Just bad luck on my part that I would not want to happen to anyone else.

Thanks,

chris


Good point about the heat from heater-dryers. I had a flooded basement (with carpeting) and they use big fan blowers, not heaters to dry the space. The carpet had to go (which is a given) but the space dried out, no mold. I wouldn't want heaters going where the wine is either.
 
Posts: 1923 | Location: Etobicoke (Toronto burb) | Registered: Apr 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The dryers used in my situation didn't generate the type of heat Chrisvanvino is describing. It may have raised the house temp, at most 3-5 degrees in the affected areas -- some of this will depend on the size of your home and the season (Summer v Winter will be different). Regardless, it's a good idea to move the wine. I moved mine to another part of the basement away from the damage and the dryers. No need to take the risk.


In the United States, anyone can be President. That's the problem!
 
Posts: 1115 | Location: Minneapolis, MN | Registered: Mar 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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