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Finer Wines with Great QPR?
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Moving away from "weekday" or "daily drinking" wines, what finer wines do you suggest offer better QPR?

Wines that are among the better of what you have tasted, but at a great price for that high quality. It's all about that QPR ratio, not low price.

I'll start: 2000 Giacomo Grimaldi Barolo La Coste, which I rate as a 94, but auctions for $65 to $70. A great wine for a great price.


I have enjoyed great health at a great age because everyday since I can remember I have consumed a bottle of wine except when I have not felt well. Then I have consumed two bottles. - Bishop of Seville
 
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JJ prum Riesling
 
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all ports.


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Barolo, Barbaresco....anything Nebbiolo
 
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NV Champagne
 
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jhcolman - it's a QPR if the second digit of the score is higher than the first digit of the price, until you get to the hundreds, in which case it's the first 2 digits of the price.

So a 95 point wine that sells for $44 is a good QPR, but a 95 point wine that sells for $73 isn't.

That was a tongue-in-cheek formula a friend originally applied to Parker years ago, but the good news is, if you're going to buy by points, you can always find someone somewhere who gave high points to a wine. Vino Vixen, where are you . . .?


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Chartogne-Taillet Cuvee Fiacre

Cédric Bouchard Champagne Inflorescence Blanc de Noirs Val Vilaine


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Quinta do Crasto Old Vines Reserva at around $45 is a tremendous value and will age gracefully.


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2009 GARNACHA ALTO MONCAYO CAMPO DE BORJA ($40 locally) is drinking comfortably above its' price point, IMO.
 
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Pretty much any red produced by Lopez de Heredia.
 
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quote:
That was a tongue-in-cheek formula a friend originally applied to Parker years ago, but the good news is, if you're going to buy by points, you can always find someone somewhere who gave high points to a wine. Vino Vixen, where are you . . .?

http://www.vinovixen.com/The_V.../The_Vino_Vixen.html

but she has so many accolades. Eek


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$50 - $100 1980's bordeaux is great value.


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Grower producer Champagne - e.g. Louise Brison Blanc de Blanc 2004, $75
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Wine Canuck:
$50 - $100 1980's bordeaux is great value.


I certainly beg to differ

1980 is by far one of the *WORST* years I've ever tasted.

will also add that 1991 is another year that i would never ever buy


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quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
jhcolman - it's a QPR if the second digit of the score is higher than the first digit of the price, until you get to the hundreds, in which case it's the first 2 digits of the price.

So a 95 point wine that sells for $44 is a good QPR, but a 95 point wine that sells for $73 isn't.

That was a tongue-in-cheek formula a friend originally applied to Parker years ago, but the good news is, if you're going to buy by points, you can always find someone somewhere who gave high points to a wine. Vino Vixen, where are you . . .?


I guess that formula would apply to Parker scores, which I find (by my taste) generally to be a couple of points on the high side. Big Grin And if the wine is fully bodied, full fruited, in "international style", it definitely has high Parker QPR. Big Grin Big Grin . Personally, and I think for most folks, there are not many wines that rate over a true 95.

Here in Canada, it's pretty well impossible to buy a wine that would warrant true 93 score for $30 or under (more like $50 or more here), or a wine that would warrant a true 95 for $50 or under (more like $100 or more here). And perhaps barely possible in the US, given lower taxes on alcohol. Unless you inflate your scores, as many wine pundits do.

All of the above is any event totally irrelevent, as both wine scores and QPR are a matter of personal taste. But when I see a consensus of both professional and lay taste opinion that a wine has good QPR, I pay attention.

Cheers,

Jhcolman

This message has been edited. Last edited by: jhcwine,


I have enjoyed great health at a great age because everyday since I can remember I have consumed a bottle of wine except when I have not felt well. Then I have consumed two bottles. - Bishop of Seville
 
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quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
Quinta do Crasto Old Vines Reserva at around $45 is a tremendous value and will age gracefully.


along those lines, quinta do vale meao is stunning @ 75$ and will rival most fine wines out there.


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quote:
Originally posted by jhcolman:

Here in Canada, it's pretty well impossible to buy a wine that would warrant true 93 score for $30 or under (more like $50 or more here), or a wine that would warrant a true 95 for $50 or under (more like $100 or more here)

What's a true score?


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Roagna Barbaresco Asili, Burlotto Barolo Monvigliero, B. Levet Cote-Rotie "Le Chavaroche", Chapoutier Chateauneuf-du-Pape "Barbe Rac", Beaucastel Chateauneuf-du-Pape Blanc, and San Giusto a Rentenanno "Percarlo" (if Sangiovese is your thing) are all truly top-rate, world class wines in many/most vintages and all available easily under $100.

Still, the best values in top-rate wines are the central European dinner whites. A few highlight producers among many many capable of producing prodigious wines are Muller-Catoir, A.J. Adam, Willi Schaefer in Germany; Nikolaihof and F.X Pichler in Austria.

For sweet wine, Baumard Quarts de Chaume has to be way up there.


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All of the above is any event totally irrelevent, as both wine scores and QPR are a matter of personal taste.

All true. That's why I posted about the even more irrelevant Vixen. Wineglas was thoughtful enough to post a link. Thanks dude.
She's got the best name in the business IMO.

I really have no idea who she is, I just like the name. Smile

BTW - don't forget that just as QPR is a matter of personal taste, so is "finer" wine. I'm not sure how you define that but price and fineness don't have a lot to do with each other.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
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quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
Quinta do Crasto Old Vines Reserva at around $45 is a tremendous value and will age gracefully.


along those lines, quinta do vale meao is stunning @ 75$ and will rival most fine wines out there.


Also along those lines, the "second wine" of Quinta do Vale Meao, the Meandro, is also an impressive bottle at about $35 locally.


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quote:
BTW - don't forget that just as QPR is a matter of personal taste, so is "finer" wine. I'm not sure how you define that but price and fineness don't have a lot to do with each other.


Totally agree, GregT. So with all that in mind, which wines are fine and QPR for you?


I have enjoyed great health at a great age because everyday since I can remember I have consumed a bottle of wine except when I have not felt well. Then I have consumed two bottles. - Bishop of Seville
 
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Belle Glos


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Chateauneuf-du-Pape

Cote du Ventoux

Cote de Roussillon

Gigondas

Cornas

Crozes-Hermitages

Almost everything else from the Rhone


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So with all that in mind, which wines are fine and QPR for you?


Well, from Ridge for example, the Three Valleys is often every bit as good as the more expensive bottlings. Their estate Cab is also a pretty good value.

Qupe Central Coast Syrah has to be in there - outclasses many wines costing a lot more.

I tend to drink a lot of Spanish wine so many wines from Rioja - CVNE Imperal GR will last your lifetime and put to shame many wines costing several times as much. As will the Contino Olivos and from places like Bodegas Riojanas, the Monte Real - it's really an underrated wine. The 1981 is stunningly good right now.

From Ribera del Duero in Burgos, you have places like Cillar de Silos, Valderiz, J.A. Calvo Casajus and Condado de Haza, all of which turn out wines that outperform their contemporaries in their respective price ranges at 10, 15, 20 years.

Cru Beaujolais is usually a great QPR depending on producer - Brun and Chermette are 2 reliable ones.

Produttori del Barbaresco, from their basic Barbaresco to their single-vineyard bottlings can hold their own with Barbaresco and Barolo costing much more.

Guigal's Brune et Blonde is really good in some vintages. A few St. Josephs - the region gets less respect than other N. Rhone areas. Crozes Hermitage can be a good value.

Château Maris Continuite de Nature from Minervois is currently one of my favorite Carignans from anywhere. Hard to find some of them but a lot of the wines from places like Minervois, Roussillon, etc. A lot of crap but some great stuff.

For sweets and fortifieds that's also the place to look. Rivesaltes from the early 1900s are actually affordable. Sherries too.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
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In addition to my above comments, I'll be a bit obnoxious...

I could make an argument that Dujac Clos St. Denis and Clos de la Roche deserve mention on this thread. Both are priced way, way up in the sky -- perhaps in the substrata; but I simply know of no other wine not priced in outer space that can compete with these. Truly amongst the very most enjoyable wines in the world to drink, for my palate, and kindof, maybe, sortof, capable of being afforded by many wine lovers. Whereas the only similar wines I know of -- DRCs and the Grand Cru Leroys (and other Grand Cru Dujacs) -- are simply not priced in the mortal realm.


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