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Pinot Noir - Decant or Not
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New here so hello to all. Been drinking wine for a few years and have a few bottles in the cellar.

Would like to get fellow forumites opinion on the subject. I am thinking of Burgundies, Cali Pinots and Oregon Pinots. A few years back, I opened a '05 Prieur Beaune PCru, no decant, and its completely tasteless. On the other hand, an '09 Belle Glos Clark is singing right out of the bottle. Yet an '08 Oregon, pnp, is very muted. Thanks for the input and advice.

Hare
 
Posts: 30 | Registered: Nov 11, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by hare:
New here so hello to all. Been drinking wine for a few years and have a few bottles in the cellar.

Would like to get fellow forumites opinion on the subject. I am thinking of Burgundies, Cali Pinots and Oregon Pinots. A few years back, I opened a '05 Prieur Beaune PCru, no decant, and its completely tasteless. On the other hand, an '09 Belle Glos Clark is singing right out of the bottle. Yet an '08 Oregon, pnp, is very muted. Thanks for the input and advice.

Hare


I would give them a light decant but you don't want to get too zealous with some lighter ones to preserve the freshness and ethereal qualities.

I give it an hour in the decanter and then let it develop in the glass.
 
Posts: 1657 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think it's more a difference in regional style than wines not decanted. I haven't tried the '09 Belle Glos Clark, but I've had the '10, and it simply has a very powerful fruit-forward nose (and taste), even right out of the bottle. Typically Oregon and Burgandy pinot are less aromatic.
That being said, I think decanting or providing an hour or two of air time will help them open up. Also make sure you are drinking them cool enough. Serving temp for pinot noir should be about 60F. Serve above that and you may be losing some of the delicate aromas in Burgandy, for example.
Good luck.
 
Posts: 147 | Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota | Registered: Jul 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We discussed "to decant or not decant" old barolos here http://forums.winespectator.co...897086832#2897086832
In addition to old barolisti such as Bartolo Mascarello or Bruno Giacosa being against decanting, also the late Prof. Émile Peynaud in his book “The Taste of Wine” claims that exposure to oxygen can be harmful to wine: “Only bottles which have a deposit need to be decanted, whatever the nature of the deposit and whatever the age of the bottle. Consequently, a bottle which has no deposit can be served straightaway. ...If it is necessary to decant, it should be done at the last moment, just before sitting down or just before serving – never in advance.”
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Amsterdam | Registered: Oct 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Echoing some of what GoBlue2002 said.

I think part of the problem you're having is an expectation that Belle Glos will have similar characteristics to a Beaune 1er Cru. Despite being made of the same grape they are diametrically opposed in style. The reason people appreciate burgundy is due to it's subtlety and nuance, whereas the Belle Glos is entirely hedonistic. Your burgundy was also probably not totally ready to drink, '05 was a very structured vintage and most won't be drinking well for a few years yet and when it does don't expect it to taste like the Belle Glos.

decanting probably had very little to do with this and rarely benefits Pinot Noir IMO.


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Posts: 723 | Location: Toronto, Ontario (Etobicoke) | Registered: Oct 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the advice. My takeaway is that pinot noir does not need much decanting, at least for North American makes. Makes sense to me as I like to see how they evolve once opened.

On Burg PCru and GCru, how long would you bottle age them, say for '05 and '08 vintages? if opening young, will decanting help open them up?
 
Posts: 30 | Registered: Nov 11, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by hare:
Thanks for the advice. My takeaway is that pinot noir does not need much decanting, at least for North American makes. Makes sense to me as I like to see how they evolve once opened.

On Burg PCru and GCru, how long would you bottle age them, say for '05 and '08 vintages? if opening young, will decanting help open them up?


It's tough to generalize, but for a top PC or GC, I wouldn't even look at the bottle for at least 15 years.

Do not open young and try to decant as a substitute for aging.
 
Posts: 1299 | Registered: May 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Most all of the better quality OR pinots need decanting, imo. Most need at least a full hour and many require far longer to fully open.
As an example, I am under orders from the wife to decant the 06 DS Grace at least 3 hours before bringing it to the table. It is only just starting to open at that time. Same as with most Beaux Freres, Thomas, Shea, Archery Summit, and Brickhouses back to at least 04. Even the 04s are much better after an hour of decant.
 
Posts: 1896 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Most all of the better quality OR pinots need decanting, imo. Most need at least a full hour and many require far longer to fully open.
As an example, I am under orders from the wife to decant the 06 DS Grace at least 3 hours before bringing it to the table. It is only just starting to open at that time. Same as with most Beaux Freres, Thomas, Shea, Archery Summit, and Brickhouses back to at least 04. Even the 04s are much better after an hour of decant.


SANDY!!! I've been trying to reach you! does your email not work anymore?


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
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Posts: 12122 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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g-man;

I sent you an email, unless I mis-read yours. Did you reply back. Have heard nothing from you. Here it is again:

pinotlover at hotmail dot com.

Look forward from hearing from you!
 
Posts: 1896 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Welcome to the forum hare!

Pinot tops my list of favorites, when it's good. I generally decant. The question is for how long. Younger ones seem to benefit with some time in the decanter, and older ones may have sediment. I'm not a fan of sediment floating around my glass of wine.

The trouble with Pinot is that it is so variable (terroir, vintage, winemaker, oak treatment...). It is difficult to generalize. Having a taste before or right after decanting can give insight as to how much if any air time it needs.

Cheers,
 
Posts: 1896 | Location: Etobicoke (Toronto burb) | Registered: Apr 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
g-man;

I sent you an email, unless I mis-read yours. Did you reply back. Have heard nothing from you. Here it is again:

pinotlover at hotmail dot com.

Look forward from hearing from you!


tyty, sent


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 12122 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would splash decant all three of those.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36827 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Board-O:
I would splash decant all three of those.

Will pouring through a Vinturi achieve the same result as splash decanting?
 
Posts: 30 | Registered: Nov 11, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I guess so, but if there is no sediment, splash decanting is easier.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36827 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I guess so, but if there is no sediment, splash decanting is easier.


+1 on the splash decant - works great on many young wines.
 
Posts: 1896 | Location: Etobicoke (Toronto burb) | Registered: Apr 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In my experience, no red wine is harmed from an hour in the decanter. But that said, I would estimate that New World pinots are the wines that benefit the least from decanting. Your example of the '05 Burgundy is just silly, as I'm sure it was just waaaay too young and totally closed down when you tried it, and no amount of decanting will help that. You should be holding all but your most modest '05 Burgundies still.

It is always better to serve a wine that has been properly aged, rather than to try to serve a wine that is too young, and try to compensate with a long decant.


Stay thirsty my friends.
 
Posts: 3115 | Location: Saginaw, MI | Registered: Mar 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Redhawk, I'll agree with some of that, but I can name several red wines that tired quickly and would not survive an hour. Also, I think New World Pinot Noirs are the wines that benefit the most from decanting, young ones anyway.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36827 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am very reluctant to decant CA and WA state pinots as some of the ones I tried (Belle Glos, Pahlmeyer, Boedecker '08/'09 vintages) evolved into a toffee/caramel/cinnamon kind of taste a couple of hours after opening. Not crazy with that confected taste. Luckily, have not had a Burgundy that evolved into that.
 
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