WineSpectator.com    Wine Spectator Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Wine Conversations    Aging Chateauneuf du Pape
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Aging Chateauneuf du Pape
 Login/Join 
Member
posted
My wine mentors gave me a lot of worthy advice. One of which is they suggested CdPs reward aging. Right now I'm enjoying the 2001 and 2003 vintages.

In reading some other boards though and the CT notes, I see a lot of people enjoying or trying them young. The gist of it is that they don't seem to think aging rounds out the rusticity or aren't worth the cellar space (which I'm running out of too). There is always vintage and producer character, but I've heard the 2008s are good candidates for earlier drinking.

I don't begrudge anyone for when they drink their own wines.

How much age do you like on your CdPs? For which vintages do you find yourself reaching lately?
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Milwaukee, WI | Registered: Dec 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Swade:
My wine mentors gave me a lot of worthy advice. One of which is they suggested CdPs reward aging. Right now I'm enjoying the 2001 and 2003 vintages.

In reading some other boards though and the CT notes, I see a lot of people enjoying or trying them young. The gist of it is that they don't seem to think aging rounds out the rusticity or aren't worth the cellar space (which I'm running out of too). There is always vintage and producer character, but I've heard the 2008s are good candidates for earlier drinking.

I don't begrudge anyone for when they drink their own wines.

How much age do you like on your CdPs? For which vintages do you find yourself reaching lately?


Rule of thumb is very young or >10yrs. I'll try some of my '03s this year, but I've been drinking some '03s since I bought them originally (Fortia, both Usseglios) while waiting on VT, VD, Pegau, and Beaucastel.


"Wine, one sip of this will bathe the drooping spirits in delight beyond the bliss of dreams. Be wise and taste."
- Milton
 
Posts: 3469 | Location: NW Suburbs of Chicago | Registered: Aug 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I would drink the 2003's while you wait on the 2001's. 2003 was a hot vintage so bigger wines with lower acidity.
 
Posts: 9414 | Location: minneapolis minnesota usa | Registered: Dec 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Swade - depends on what you mean by aging. I have plenty of wine from 2001 but it's not aged IMO. And the 2003s aren't even 10 years old.

However, I'd probably drink those 2003s. As mentioned, it was a hot year and some of them were already kind of alcoholic and you may as well enjoy them before they're just a mess. I'd guess that the 2005s would have been good candidates for aging - I liked that vintage but didn't really buy much. The 1998s seem to have been a good choice and I'm not in a hurry for those.

But as a general rule, I don't really age them intentionally. Whatever I have from the 90s is only because I didn't get around to drinking them for some reason, not because I intended to keep them. I like them younger. A lot of people disagree, but I'm not sure that they improve all that much, unlike a Merlot or Cab from Bordeaux does, or Tempranillo or Nebbiolo or Pinot Noir. Some older Bandols seem to indicate that Mourvedre can age, but the style of many CdPs - juicy, fruity, ripe and sweet, doesn't argue for aging as much as it argues for drinking and enjoying.

Just my 2 cts. Many disagree.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2604 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Some do seem to prefer their CdPs well aged, in the 20+ zone. I've enjoyed them young as well as older.

GregT and the others may have a point about the 2003s, as it was super hot throughout most of France.

The key is to try some at different ages and see what you like.
 
Posts: 1842 | Location: Etobicoke (Toronto burb) | Registered: Apr 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
In my experience, there's not really a wrong answer. CdPs are usually quite nice on release, and usually drink quite well through their lifetime, and the lifetime can be longer or shorter depending on vintage and producer. Pegau's Cuvee Reservee, for example, seems to be a wine that I enjoy no matter what the age. On the other hand, I find a young Beaucastel to be overly pruney, and sometimes a little hot, but once it's 10+ years or so, there's a magical transformation. I think Bois de Boursan (both regular and Cuvee Felix) to usually be earlier drinkers, while Vieux Telegraphe seems to need more time.

Vintages matter, too. '07 and '05 are definitely tighter vintages needing more age, while '04 and '08 are more up front (although '04 seems to be significantly superior overall). I don't have much experience with CdP over 14 years or so, but I have been told by several reliable sources that I would never regret keeping some of my better CdPs that long or longer.


Stay thirsty my friends.
 
Posts: 3078 | Location: Saginaw, MI | Registered: Mar 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I'm mostly a "within a year or so of release or after 10 years" kind of guy for CdP.

I like juicy grenache young as with most hedonistic cdp's. I do prefer the vast majority with age on them though. Beaucastel needs at least 10-12 years as a loose rule though I think. I'm looking forward to hitting some 2001's this year. The late 80's Beau's are just hitting their peak plateau.


Looking forward to those mags of '08 Salon.
 
Posts: 2308 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
I'm mostly a "within a year or so of release or after 10 years" kind of guy for CdP.

I like juicy grenache young as with most hedonistic cdp's. I do prefer the vast majority with age on them though. Beaucastel needs at least 10-12 years as a loose rule though I think. I'm looking forward to hitting some 2001's this year. The late 80's Beau's are just hitting their peak plateau.

+1
 
Posts: 1581 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Rule of thumb is very young or >10yrs.

Yep. Very general rule, but yes, absolutely agree.

Adding Rob and Danyull, this makes me +4


"What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?" -- W.C. Fields
 
Posts: 7563 | Registered: Dec 05, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Thanks for the replies. This is pretty much what I was told and how I've been enjoying them. It's about the same as with classed growth Bordeaux, I don't open them until they are at least ten years old. Longer for my top growths.

As for the wines from the surrounding areas, what a great area for good QPRs and daily drinkers. Good food wines. Some of those from good vintages can hold up and reward some mid-term cellaring too. I been enjoying a lot of wines from 2005 from the neighboring areas. The 2010s are really good too.
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Milwaukee, WI | Registered: Dec 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mpls wine guy:
I would drink the 2003's while you wait on the 2001's. 2003 was a hot vintage so bigger wines with lower acidity.

I agree with this.

For young CdP, the '06's are drinking well right now. I also think the '98's are drinking well, too, as are many of the 2000's.

Continue to hold '01's, '04's, and '05's.
 
Posts: 1862 | Location: L.A. | Registered: Dec 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Swade:
Thanks for the replies. This is pretty much what I was told and how I've been enjoying them. It's about the same as with classed growth Bordeaux, I don't open them until they are at least ten years old. Longer for my top growths.

As for the wines from the surrounding areas, what a great area for good QPRs and daily drinkers. Good food wines. Some of those from good vintages can hold up and reward some mid-term cellaring too. I been enjoying a lot of wines from 2005 from the neighboring areas. The 2010s are really good too.


Bordeaux is quite different though, and at one time people drank the CdPs while they were waiting for their Bordeaux to come around. These days, since CdPs have become expensive, people think they all need to come around too, but that's not always the case. Really depends on the producer and preference.

You don't want to drink most "better" Bordeaux on release, whereas a lot of CdP can be quite good on release. The surrounding areas are today what CdP was back in the 1960s and 70s and 80s.

Actually, that's not quite true. They're not the same in terms of winemaking, which has improved exponentially. They're the same in terms of niche, where people don't think they need aging, they are to be consumed young, etc. But watch what happens to say, Gigondas over the next 10 years.

Not to get into any kind of argument whatsoever, but the thing to remember is that price does not mean a wine needs time. There are plenty of cheap wines that improve dramatically, and plenty of expensive wines that don't.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2604 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

WineSpectator.com    Wine Spectator Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Wine Conversations    Aging Chateauneuf du Pape

© Wine Spectator 2013