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I'm done with Australian wine
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LOL

Well, I'm not throwing out what I have left.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36781 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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+1
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Milwaukee, WI | Registered: Dec 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm actually hoping that with the demise of Miller we'll start to see a better variety and diversity of style of wines from Australia starting to get imported. The last 5+ years or so I felt like we were just getting the wines Miller liked in the US.

With the screw caps there should be no mold. Big Grin


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7632 | Location: Gilroy, CA  | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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http://www.stefaniawine.com

Just to let you know that Austrailian wine is still good for something:

Chocolate – Red Wine Bundt Cake

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • ¾ cup unsweetened cocoa powder (not Dutch process)
  • 1¼ teaspoons baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
  • 1¾ cups sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1¼ cups dry red wine
  • Confectioner's sugar, for dusting

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350°. Grease and flour a 12-cup bundt pan.

In a bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt.

In a large bowl, beat the butter with the sugar at medium-high speed until fluffy, 4 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until incorporated. Add the vanilla and beat for 2 minutes longer. Working in two batches, alternately fold in the dry ingredients and the wine, until just incorporated.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan, and bake for 45 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let the cake cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then turn it out onto a rack; let cool completely. Dust the cake with confectioner's sugar and serve with a dollop of whipped cream.


Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party - Jimmy Buffett
 
Posts: 125 | Registered: Sep 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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But it calls for dry red wine.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36781 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had a nasty Bardolino the other day, so I'm considering giving up European wine. :-)
 
Posts: 792 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Aug 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I'm actually hoping that with the demise of Miller we'll start to see a better variety and diversity of style of wines from Australia starting to get imported. The last 5+ years or so I felt like we were just getting the wines Miller liked in the US.

With the screw caps there should be no mold. Big Grin

It will take a lot more than the demise of Jay Miller to resurrect Australian wine. Repositioning the Australia brand image is going to take a lot of investment and effort.

Australia has always had a knack for building one monolothic blockbuster image for itself and then wondering how to get out of it. Paul Hogan did a great job of building up tourism based on the Crocodile Dundee personna, but it turned into a blind alley and they had to live with it for many years before the world looked at them any other way.
 
Posts: 5108 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Feb 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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With the screw caps there should be no mold.

Somehow that sounds almost profound. Reminds me of those old Orson Welles commercials for Paul Masson.

Maybe they should have Chuck Norris deliver the line?


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2599 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It's probably been almost 2 years since I've bought any Aussies. Just got tired of the over-the-top style.
Cali cabs are approaching that zenith also.


***********
A father is someone who has pictures where his money used to be.
 
Posts: 6777 | Location: Everett, WA | Registered: Mar 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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this topic made me laugh out loud, ha ha. These boards are absurd! Perfect mix of serious wine talk and ripping on ridiculous people.
 
Posts: 860 | Location: Chicago | Registered: Aug 04, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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New world Spain has been tanking as well, and may never come back. Parker/Miller/Ordonez/Solomon were really responsible for that rise and then subsequent fall.

I am not sure how Australia can recover in this country. So many folks paid lots of good money from about 1998-2006 for these wines that just do not age. They sat in the cellars, and still do. Each time a cork gets popped, another "potential" Australian wine buyer recalls that they will never buy these wines again.

There are many good wines made there, yet they are just impossible to sell.


Daniel Posner
www.grapesthewineco.com-
"But is anyone speaking for consumers' best interest? One liquor store owner, Daniel Posner of Grapes the Wine Company..."-Wine Spectator
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"You're not here to help us. You're here to help yourself..."-Board-O
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Posts: 749 | Location: New York | Registered: May 06, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Margaret River, I just want go on the record now.
 
Posts: 8677 | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by on the wine:
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I'm actually hoping that with the demise of Miller we'll start to see a better variety and diversity of style of wines from Australia starting to get imported. The last 5+ years or so I felt like we were just getting the wines Miller liked in the US.

With the screw caps there should be no mold. Big Grin

It will take a lot more than the demise of Jay Miller to resurrect Australian wine. Repositioning the Australia brand image is going to take a lot of investment and effort.

Australia has always had a knack for building one monolothic blockbuster image for itself and then wondering how to get out of it. Paul Hogan did a great job of building up tourism based on the Crocodile Dundee personna, but it turned into a blind alley and they had to live with it for many years before the world looked at them any other way.


Some of the once renowned wine regions suffer from climatic change. Difficult to produce wines with good balance there today, eg: Hunter Valley Semillon is dead. Look out for the newer regions in "colder" climate, instead of the historic regions.


There is nothing in our intelligence that has not passed by the senses. (Aristoteles)
 
Posts: 1877 | Location: Luxemburg | Registered: Nov 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I'm actually hoping that with the demise of Miller we'll start to see a better variety and diversity of style of wines from Australia starting to get imported. The last 5+ years or so I felt like we were just getting the wines Miller liked in the US.

With the screw caps there should be no mold. Big Grin


Oh, you mean like the wines the Aussies themselves enjoy? A certain person keeps sticking these into our blind tastings and they keep rating at or near the top, even with strictly traditional palates. A lot of these are wines that are not imported to the U.S.
 
Posts: 1771 | Location: Mountain View, CA | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by spo:
Margaret River, I just want go on the record now.


+100

I would put a 2001 Moss Wood Cabernet against pretty much any other 2001 Cabernet world wide and a) it would more than hold its own and b) you wouldn't say "Aussie!"


Looking forward to those mags of '08 Salon.
 
Posts: 2301 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by MoselleLuxemburg:
eg: Hunter Valley Semillon is dead. Look out for the newer regions in "colder" climate, instead of the historic regions.


Not so sure about Hunter Valley Semillon being "dead". The Hunter has always been a warm climate region, and I enjoyed some great Semillons when I was there in April. You're absolutely right, though, that it is the cooler climate regions that are doing the most interesting things right now, IMO.
 
Posts: 792 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Aug 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by spo:
Margaret River, I just want go on the record now.


+100

I would put a 2001 Moss Wood Cabernet against pretty much any other 2001 Cabernet world wide and a) it would more than hold its own and b) you wouldn't say "Aussie!"


Absolutely! Margaret River cabs age beautifully, and new vintages of Moss Wood and Cullen Diana Madeline are great value buys right now (relatively speaking), if you can find them.
 
Posts: 792 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Aug 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by yhn:

Oh, you mean like the wines the Aussies themselves enjoy? A certain person keeps sticking these into our blind tastings and they keep rating at or near the top, even with strictly traditional palates. A lot of these are wines that are not imported to the U.S.


Exactly. I hope some small importers will take a chance. I don't really give a rats ass what the big marketing machines do and if Aussie wine ever pours back into the country in volume, but it would be nice to have seom of the wines the Aussie themselves drink come into the country.

So the screw cap crack was both a joke, and serious. Almost all the wine consumed in Australia is under cap. The only thing they use cork on is/was wine intended for the US. I'm looking for that as a signal.

Cork = Miller/Goopy/Sweet Crap
Cap = Something the Aussie drink themselves.

It may not be that simple of course bit it is simple to eliminate anything under cork from Australia as something not worth taking a risk on.


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7632 | Location: Gilroy, CA  | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've had some nice Rieslings from Australia


"Wine, one sip of this will bathe the drooping spirits in delight beyond the bliss of dreams. Be wise and taste."
- Milton
 
Posts: 3468 | Location: NW Suburbs of Chicago | Registered: Aug 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We only have two Aussie wines I put on the wine list at the club.

2010 Two Hands Bella's Garden Shiraz
2007 Torbreck the Steading GSM.

We featured the Torbreck for $15 a glass and it is awesome wine.
 
Posts: 9407 | Location: minneapolis minnesota usa | Registered: Dec 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It is unfortunate what the Australian wine industry has done to itself. It is going to take a long time for them to reposition themselves in a better light...The problem is so many places follow a trend rather than try to be themselves....

At least some Margaret River stuff gets imported...Hopefully they make a good name for themselves. Hunter Shiraz would really appeal to wine geeks but you basically see none of it in the US and people will automatically put it in the same boat as SA Shiraz. Aged Hunter Semillon is also really fantastic but there just isn't a good market for it....

Out of everything, I see Australian Riesling as one thing that might do well in the US. They prefer a bone dry style with very high acidity...ages very well and is priced right. It would fill a gap that exists in the US market.
 
Posts: 66 | Registered: Apr 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Agree with Polymer and aphilla, Riesling is the only wine I've purchased from Australia in years.



Got acid?
@@@@@@@@@@@@
Everyone has to believe in something. I believe I’ll have another glass of wine.
 
Posts: 1441 | Location: Redstate USA | Registered: Mar 01, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, I had some Yellowtail from Austrailia, so now I'm done with wine altogether.


Ἐν οἴνῳ ἀλήθεια
En Vino Veritas
 
Posts: 289 | Location: New Orleans, LA | Registered: Dec 14, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I purchase Yarra Yering Dry Red #1 if I see it around. Definitely would not be picked as Aussie in any blind lineup.


GG
 
Posts: 274 | Location: Galveston, TX | Registered: Apr 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some relevant replies from an interview with Andrew Caillard MW.

"With such profound depth of history, compelling stories and
beautiful wines, I find it bizarre that negative sentiment about Australian wine pervades the international media.
It is true that trade is being knocked about and there are vicissitudes within the Australian wine industry, but I am surprised at the level of spite, exaggeration and disingenuous debate that is currently doing the rounds."

"At the top end, where should real wine lovers be looking in Australia?

The cult wine scene – which was really driven by Robert Parker and his ilk – did much to skew the impression of Australian wine.
Australians are really not into overly powerful, high alcohol wines, yet the strength of Parker's opinions opened up export markets. As predicted by many observers on the local scene these wines have lost cachet in the American because many just haven't aged very well.
The big joke is that the American critics who lionised these overly concentrated wine solids are now the same people putting the boot in."


Wine tastes better upside down.
 
Posts: 1186 | Location: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Sep 14, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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