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Non-Barbaressco or Barolo wines such as Langhe and D'Alba are what I am wondering about.

Can these do 4-7 years? They have a decent amount of tannin and acid. I have been buying some while giving my Barbaresco and Barolo time to age. I figure I mine as well drink them when they are nice.



Hunter, I apologize for the general nature of this question.
 
Posts: 8671 | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would say most certainly they can keep that long. Some might not even start showing well bfore four years of age.

The issue is producer. Vietti make a Langhe nebbiolo called Perbacco that is fully Barolo, containing juice from some prime real estate in the appellation. Another way to say it is that Perbacco is declassified Barolo.

I believe Sandrone and G. Conterno do this also, as a way to preserve the highest possible standards for the Barolo appellation.

Even lesser nebbiolo should hold for that period, though.
 
Posts: 592 | Location: ann arbor, MI | Registered: Mar 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Chaad. I will use these to keep me from doing something stupid with my underage Barbaresco and Baroli. Probably a little Barbera, Valpiocello, Montepulciano de Abruzzo, Aglianico, Chianti and others will be necessary to perform the same function.
 
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What can happen sometimes is that the fruit fades, even though acidity and tannins keeps the wine alive in other respects. Which of course leaves you with a feeling of missing the sweet spot on that bottle. Basically, you have to know what the producer intended for that particular wine.

Keep in mind that some producers sometimes choose a lesser classification to circumvent the appellation laws. The prime example would be Angelo Gaja who adds a little Barbera to what is essentially top class Barolo and slaps Langhe on the label. And Sandrones Valmaggiore is way better than many Baroli, and rewards ageing.

//anders


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Posts: 212 | Location: Stockholm, Sweden | Registered: Dec 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had the '09 Perbacco on a business trip in Atlanta. It was very nice. So I got one at home to try. My wife loves it. I'll probably get more. So what are folks experience with aging this stuff now? I described it as grippy on the finish and think it will last awhile, but am not really sure.


"Wine, one sip of this will bathe the drooping spirits in delight beyond the bliss of dreams. Be wise and taste."
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Posts: 3462 | Location: NW Suburbs of Chicago | Registered: Aug 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ha! How weird to see this pop up. I did not try on release and then lay down nebbiolos. I just laid them down. Every single one of them was kind of dissapointing. The nebbiolos I buy and drink young were always preferrable to any I aged. Maybe a false conclusion on a less than perfect experiment, I admit that, but I think with alba and langhes the tannins and acid's intensities will outlast the fruit so I don't bother aging. I think I am throwing in the towel on nebbiolo and looking to aglianico. A much freindlier grape in my experience.
 
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p.s. I like Roero and Gattinara. Better than Langhe and d'Alba but do not seem to require the age that Barolo or Barbaresco do. Very limited experience with these but those experiences were consistently good.
 
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We did a blind tasting of eight '96-'00 Langhes. For the most part they were on the young side (and the Gaja placed 6th).

For young Nebs, I've gotten the most pleasure most often from less prestigious areas.
 
Posts: 1771 | Location: Mountain View, CA | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Langhe Nebbiolo DOC and Nebbiolo d'Alba DOC can provide excellent value if chosen properly.
One of my favorite is Bruno Giacosa Nebbiolo d'Alba. He buys the grapes from a plot in Valmaggiore di Vezza d'Alba, located north of the Barolo and west of the Barbaresco DOCG borders. He must have been producing this Nebbiolo since the 1970s as I remember seeing very old bottles. It reminds me of Barbaresco more than Barolo, as it is more elegant than powerful. If blind tasted I bet it would be among the top Barbarescos. I buy it in Italy for 10-12 euros, but I am afraid it is much more expensive in other markets.
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Amsterdam | Registered: Oct 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by spo:
Ha! How weird to see this pop up. I did not try on release and then lay down nebbiolos. I just laid them down. Every single one of them was kind of dissapointing. The nebbiolos I buy and drink young were always preferrable to any I aged. Maybe a false conclusion on a less than perfect experiment, I admit that, but I think with alba and langhes the tannins and acid's intensities will outlast the fruit so I don't bother aging. I think I am throwing in the towel on nebbiolo and looking to aglianico. A much freindlier grape in my experience.

I'm not a huge fan of aged nebbiolo, either. More specifically, "middle aged" nebbiolo. I prefer it young, up to about 5 years after the vintage, or fully mature, as in 10+ after. In between, they seem to go into a "dumb phase," and just don't offer much aside from hardness.

Aglianico is a favorite of mine, especially from northern Campania (e.g. Benevento area) and Vulture's Venosa area. Producers up on Vulture in the more famed communes Rionero and Barile seem to be, generally, more "modern" and dense and fruity; not to my taste, usually.
 
Posts: 592 | Location: ann arbor, MI | Registered: Mar 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I did not try on release and then lay down nebbiolos. I just laid them down

Good lesson! I'd suggest never doing that with any wine unless you know it pretty well, either by producer or at least region.

But for early drinking, Mauro Molino Nebbiolo is wonderful - I have no idea how they age because we drink them fast. Kind of a "modern" style but with characteristic Nebbiolo sour cherry notes. Produttori del Barbaresco Nebbiolo from certain vintages will reward a few years. And then there are those referenced above where they're as good as any of the "official" wines.

Also Gattinara produces Nebbiolo - Travaglini and Antoniolo come to mind as they're readily available. It usually seems a little leaner than the other regions, but they're a lot cheaper and can reward aging.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2588 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It only took about 5 years to get about 10 replies. Who says there is not much activity on this forum?

I have an 03 Mauro Molino Barolo, I hope I did not hold it till its akward middle age phase. But with my luck... on the other hand I have an 01 Antoniolo and last time I had it it was awesome. Chaad, I have not had enough aglianico to start having favorites or noticing regional characteristics. Maybe the Bisceglia... but looking forward to trying more.
 
Posts: 8671 | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
It only took about 5 years to get about 10 replies. Who says there is not much activity on this forum?

LOL

The place is rockin! Let's get this party started!

Banana Banana Banana


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2588 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Most Langhe Nebbiolo drink well after 2-3 years of bottle age. IMO most Nebbiolo need at least a few years. Only a few Langhe or D'Alba are made to last for longer. One of my favorites is the Langhe Nebbiolo Ginestra from Aldo Conterno. This is a 3-5 year aging kind of Nebbiolo.

When it comes to Aglianico, Galardi is my favorite, but quite expensive. More reasonably priced are Di Majo Norante (Molise) and Vinosia (Irpinia). But this is an entirely different grape variety with a totally different character. For me it could never replace a Nebbiolo based wine!


Albert Jochems
- life is to short to drink bad wines -
 
Posts: 719 | Location: The Netherlands | Registered: Aug 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have some 2000 Giorgio Pelissero Langhe Now that is drinking wonderfully and will probably continue to do so for at least another 20 years.


When in doubt, open another bottle.
 
Posts: 2607 | Location: Silver Spring MD (Near DC) | Registered: Nov 13, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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