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Vintages January 19 2013
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Awesome, thanks for the note! Do you think it would reward with more time in the cellar?


Victory loves preparation.
 
Posts: 293 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Nov 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Who is that question for? Myself, or IT?
 
Posts: 10955 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 17, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It was for IT.

I generally thought BDM's needed more time to come around, but I'm fairly inexperienced so if you have insight to the contrary I'd also love to hear it! Also any producers you think would be more approachable younger, as my cellar is very young and I don't have easy access to older vintages.

Edited for clarification.


Victory loves preparation.
 
Posts: 293 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Nov 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, to get the full experience of Brunello, it does need cellaring. Obviously there are vintage and producer discrepancies, not to mention vineyard variations since Montalcino has many microclimates within it. Generally speaking, from excellent vintages, I like 10+ years on them, and 6-8 from average-to-very good vintages at a minimum.

That said, young Brunello can be consumed, but it's finicky. I've found that you can check in on bottles within the first 6-12 months of release before they shut down. Sure, you won't get the full development that only bottle age will provide, but at least you can get a sense of the wine at a young age. The problem is that this guideline that I use is based on release from the cellar - not from when it shows up in the market. DOCG laws dictate that Brunello can't be released to market until five years after the harvest - therefore 2007 Brunello couldn't be sold until 2012. As a result, you're playing with fire drinking 2007s now, as they may be open and drinking well, or they may have already shut down. Since 2007 was a warmer vintage, that "open" window seems to be a little longer. 2006s at the same point were already shut down pretty firmly. Again, I'm making generalizations.

Anyway, there are several threads on Brunello producers, aging, etc, with great comments from the Italophiles on this board such as Longboarder, Jochems, PurpleHaze, and others. A quick search will point you in the right direction.

As for the 2007 Caprili, if you have access to some, I'd give it a shot. I followed a bottle over four hours last night and it was very enjoyable. Much better than dealing with the -14C weather here in Toronto.

Here's a link to my note on the wine.
 
Posts: 10955 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 17, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Fantastic. I hope I can snag a bottle or two when they get released. I'll also start doing a bit of research on BdMs discussed here and also available at LBCO. And yes, weather has been particularly miserable these past few days.


Victory loves preparation.
 
Posts: 293 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Nov 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
Awesome, thanks for the note! Do you think it would reward with more time in the cellar?


No doubt it's meant for the long haul as it truly came across as more northern Rhone in style..The vibrancy and structure should make this a wine with a long life..

The subjective part is 'will it reward' more time and my short answer is it's drinking so beautifully now, why bother waiting but there were a few 'pros' that said it should evolve more over the 3-4 years, but does that mean better? Who knows....

On a side note, had the Tournon from this release on Sunday night and it was almost as wonderful and a real steal for $30:

My note in CT:

Not quite as good as the Malakoff, but still a stunning very 'Northern Rhone' style Shiraz that was absolutely delicious after an hour or so of aeration, the future of 'serious' Aussie reds? - Dark red, full bodied with a nose of plum, blueberry, raspberry, meat, pepper and vanilla, impeccably integrated and structured, silky smooth on the palate with excellent length, very tasty! (93 Points). (88 views)

Nice stuff, hat's off to Mr. Chapoutier..

Cheers,

- Ian
 
Posts: 174 | Location: Kitchener, Ontario Canada | Registered: Apr 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will definitely open the Malakoff soon then.


Victory loves preparation.
 
Posts: 293 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Nov 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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