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What to pair with tourtiere?
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My inlaws invited us over for tourtiere. Any suggestions on wine pairing?


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1473 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Southern Rhone, or south France (even Spain) with Rhone varieties, seems like a natural. I'm sure new world versions can be equally suitable.
 
Posts: 2560 | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I learned a new word today, thanks. Pair it with your favorite hearty red and I'm sure it will be fantastic, or as Mr. Kramer suggests in his latest feature article on the website, match it to your in-laws tastes.
 
Posts: 3898 | Location: ATL | Registered: Mar 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks. I think I will go with the 2007 Chateau Pesquie Terrasses. I just realized that my in-laws don't have proper stemware, so I won't go any fancier than a good QPR Rhone.


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1473 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
I just realized that my in-laws don't have proper stemware, so I won't go any fancier than a good QPR Rhone.

You also just realized the perfect Xmas gift for the in-laws this year. Wink win/win
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
I just realized that my in-laws don't have proper stemware, so I won't go any fancier than a good QPR Rhone.

You also just realized the perfect Xmas gift for the in-laws this year. Wink win/win


Great idea, but over-ruled by my wife. I guess my mother in law really likes her crystal wine glasses and won't replace them until they break. Hmm....


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1473 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
...my mother in law really likes her crystal wine glasses and won't replace them until they break. Hmm....

Big Grin Wash the dishes for you tonight, mum?
OOPS! Clumsy boy! Razz
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Mmm, yum. Have a Quebecois b-in-law that always makes them for Christmas Eve dinner.

If they are anything like his, I'd go a step up from southern Rhone. I'd go either northern Rhone, cooler clime West Coast Syrah, or a Bordeaux blend.
 
Posts: 569 | Location: Tucson | Registered: Aug 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We needed a match for both the tourtiere and the turkey so I went with 2003 Cheval des Andes: 48% cabernet sauvignon, 47% malbec, 5% petit verdot. About to tuck in.....


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Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Cheval des Andes was a bit big for the tourtiere but matched well with the turkey - I'd say a medium bodied Italian or Spanish wine (sorry I can;t be more precise, neither is really what I know well) would match better.


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Go Tigers!!
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Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here is some interesting background info about tourtiere


Chef's Note
Traditional, yes! But there are as many recipes and individual secrets for meat pie as there are regions and cooks in Quebec.
In Quebec, meat pie is called "tourtière". What is a tourtière?
Originally it referred to a cooking utensil used to make a pie or "tourte." By 1611, the word tourtière had come to refer to the pastry containing meat or fish that was cooked in this medium-deep, round or rectangular dish.

While every region claims to be the birthplace of "real" meat pie, which is traditionally served with a tomato ketchup, the English regime also played a part in its history. Tourtière would come to be known as "Pâté à l'angloise," the red devil's delight, served with a sweet and sour condiment of vegetables and fruit.

Should potatoes be added, and if so, in what proportion? Should they be raw or cooked?

Should it made from beef, pork, veal, game or what is the best combination? Should the meat be ground or cubed?

And the spices… apart from salt and pepper, should you add cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, even sage or thyme?

Is minced onion obligatory?

First of all, let's settle the question of the pastry. Use a basic pie crust, or pâte brisée.

The difficult question is the filling
First of all, there are two basic schools. The cooked filling involves putting all the ingredients into a pot, covering them with water or stock and letting them simmer for a couple hours over low heat. Then the meat just needs to be broken up with a fork, drained if necessary, and placed into the pie crust. The actual cooking time of the tourtière itself is reduced to 20 or 30 minutes.

On the other hand, if the meat is raw, allowances have to made in the cooking time (tripling it), except in the case of "Six-pâtes" from the Lac St-Jean region, which requires 3 hours and is made from game. Fillings made with uncooked ground meat will have a denser texture when cooked in the oven, as is the case with tourtière from Rigaud.

Ingredients
Pie pastry
- 100 g (3 1/2 oz.) vegetable shortening
- 150 g (about 1 1/2 cups) all-purpose flour
- 1/2 tsp. salt
- 125 ml (1/2 cup) cold water

Basic tourtière recipe from the St. Jovite region
- 500 g (18 oz.) fresh ground pork butt
- 1 large onion, minced
- 125 ml (1/2 cup) breadcrumbs
- Salt, pepper and a pinch of nutmeg
Method
Put the pork and onion into a large pot; season; cover with water and let simmer over medium heat for 90 minutes or until the water has completely, or almost completely, evaporated;
break up the meat with a fork; correct the seasoning;
lay the bottom pie crust in a lightly buttered pie plate, letting the dough hang over the edges slightly; prick all over with a fork; place the filling into the crust, spreading it evenly with a spatula;
cover with the top crust; lightly moisten the edges to seal the top and bottom crusts together and pinch them with your fingers;
roll a small piece of aluminum foil around your finger and stick it two-thirds of the way into the middle of the pie to form a little steam vent;
brush with an egg beaten with a little milk; bake at 200° C (400° F) for 10 minutes;
reduce the temperature to 180° C (350° F) and continue baking for about 20 minutes until the crust is golden.
Regional Variations
On the Île d'Orléans…
they use ground pork, beef and veal, adding a little pork fat, a clove of garlic and some spices. The texture should be less grainy and is bound together with an egg.

In Charlevoix…
they take the recipe from the Île d'Orléans but replace the pork with hare, and all the meat and potatoes are cut into cubes, except for the chopped pork fat.

In Val-Jalbert…
they take the recipe from the Île d'Orléans, but replace the veal with a chicken breast and the water with chicken stock.

In the Outaouais region…
tourtière is made solely from duck, cut into cubes and simmered in chicken stock.

In Rigaud,..
they use pork and beef to which potatoes and a pinch of dry mustard are added.

The choice is up to you… or create your own combination!


Life without wine?...... Yeah Right.
The Unexamined Life Is Not Worth Living - Socrates
"Wine....offers a greater range for enjoyment and appreciation than possibly any other purely sensory thing which may be purchased" ERNEST HEMINGWAY (1889-1961)

ITB
 
Posts: 5643 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: Nov 14, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bman:
- I'd say a medium bodied Italian or Spanish wine (sorry I can;t be more precise, neither is really what I know well) would match better.

You are indeed correct, bman.
I've paired mid-body Spanish wines with tourtiere several times in the past and it's always been successful. Italian....not so sure.
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just an update. Thanks to everyone for your advice on pairing wine with tourtiere. I brought Petales d'Osoyoos 2005 (Merlot-dominated Bordeaux blend from BC, second wine of Osoyoos Larose) and 2007 Chateau Pesquie Terrasses. As it turns out, a bit of a crisis has arisen within the extended family, and so no one was really in the mood for wine. The tourtiere and its sauce were delicious, though.


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1473 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
The tourtiere and its sauce were delicious


Sauce? Confused Tourtiere with sauce? Eek


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Go Bruins!!
Go Tigers!!
Go Pistons!!
Go Lions!!
 
Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
The tourtiere and its sauce were delicious


Sauce? Confused Tourtiere with sauce? Eek

(hanging, shaking, head)
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just had one for a simple Supper last evening.

Paired with the 2007 Domaine de la Janasse CdR Villages Terre d'Argile.
An excellent pairing indeed.
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
The tourtiere and its sauce were delicious


Sauce? Confused Tourtiere with sauce? Eek


Hey, this is Alberta after all. Anyway, I had no idea the sauce was not authentic. Very delicious, though. Next time I'm out east I will have to seek out the authentic item.


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1473 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You are forgiven..... Wink


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Go Bruins!!
Go Tigers!!
Go Pistons!!
Go Lions!!
 
Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
Just had one for a simple Supper last evening.

Just to clarify the tourtiere mentioned earlier.
It was Duck and Venison. Yummy!
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My resident tourtiere expert says that is called tourtiere du Lac St. Jean and is traditionally made with caribou and perhaps other game meat.

Because I knew that you wanted to know that......


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Go Tigers!!
Go Pistons!!
Go Lions!!
 
Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I wonder just how many people in Guatemala prepared tourtiere this month...

I bet the local papers would love to do a human interest story on you and your better half in a slow news week, bman. Smile


___________________________

Cheers!
 
Posts: 9819 | Location: Vancouver, BC | Registered: Oct 17, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I just read her your post and was left with the impression that she might rather be dead in a ditch than be in the newspaper!

Ironically, a high-end gourmet food store here was interested in selling some of her home-made stuff but when she crunched the numbers the prices they would have to charge to cover her costs and offer some profit would have made it made the venture too risky. Too bad for Guatemala....


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Go Bruins!!
Go Tigers!!
Go Pistons!!
Go Lions!!
 
Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bman:
My resident tourtiere expert says that is called tourtiere du Lac St. Jean and is traditionally made with caribou and perhaps other game meat.

Because I knew that you wanted to know that......

Please tell your 'resident toutiere expert' that if she can source me the caribou, I'll gladly modify the recipe Razz
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Not a problem in Ottawa, you can get it here (http://www.saslovesmeat.com/) which is in the Glebe on Bank Street, or there is an elk farm just on the other side of town from Montreal http://www.elkranch.com/index.shtml. I understand you will soon be in town......


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Go Bruins!!
Go Tigers!!
Go Pistons!!
Go Lions!!
 
Posts: 11997 | Location: Ottawa Ontario | Registered: Jan 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the links, bman. I was completely unaware of the Elk availability. Good to know. I just may arrange a small order to check it out. Actually, caribou can be arranged to purchase here. It's just not always available. Usually this is done by order some time ahead.

My understanding is that Caribou is the only truly 'wild' meat available commercially here, as it's hunted and sold by the Nunavits under a federal allowance. All other meats are controlled within farming conditions.

It seems that there is a very good chance indeed that we'll be in town end of Feb.
 
Posts: 17021 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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