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French Laundry Cookbook -- as a cookbook?
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Family has asked me for a Christmas list, and for the past several years I've been primarily just putting cookbooks on it. Which brings me to my question. Of those who have the French Laundry cookbook, how many use it for cooking? I've heard it's a beautiful book, very inspiring, etc., but for the most part I want cookbooks from which I can use recipes. I'm an average to good cook, but very much a recipe follower rather than a creator. I know some (many?) of the recipes in FL cookbook are complicated and use equipment/ingredients that are always on hand or easy to find, so how often do those that own the book use it for the recipes?

Other books I'm considering putting on the list:

Colorado Cache and Creme de Colorado -- enjoyed cooking from them when lived in Denver but don't own
River Road Recipes I
Ad Hoc at Home
Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking (Hazan)
Sauces (James Peterson)

A final question, has anyone ordered a used book from other sellers on Amazon.com? OK with the experience? I'm assuming transaction takes place with Amazon and then they send money and information to the seller. Is that correct?

Thanks for the help.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: eyesintime,


“Appreciating old wine is like making love to a very old lady. It is possible. It can even be enjoyable. But it requires a bit of imagination.”

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Posts: 2568 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Jan 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hazan is really good. Probably in my top 5 cookbooks.


I've ordered books from other sellers on Amazon and it worked fine. You have a correct understanding of how it works. Shipping takes longer usually, but not a lot longer. I've been happy when I've done it.


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Posts: 3345 | Location: NW Suburbs of Chicago | Registered: Aug 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
Family has asked me for a Christmas list, and for the past several years I've been primarily just putting cookbooks on it. Which brings me to my question. Of those who have the French Laundry cookbook, how many use it for cooking? I've heard it's a beautiful book, very inspiring, etc., but for the most part I want cookbooks from which I can use recipes. I'm an average to good cook, but very much a recipe follower rather than a creator. I know some (many?) of the recipes in FL cookbook are complicated and use equipment/ingredients that are always on hand or easy to find, so how often do those that own the book use it for the recipes?

Other books I'm considering putting on the list:

Ad Hoc at
Colorado Cache and Creme de Colorado -- enjoyed cooking from them when lived in Denver but don't own
River Road Recipes I
Ad Hoc at Home
Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking (Hazan)
Sauces (James Peterson)

A final question, has anyone ordered the use books from other sellers on Amazon.com? OK with the experienc? I'm assuming transaction takes place with Amazon and then they send money and information to the seller. Is that correct?

Thanks for the help.


Only if it says shipped from amazon. Most in the market place are strictly seller to buyer with amazon there for dispute purposes.

I've bought a bunch of text books from different buyers, out of 9 purchases, 5 of them are for different prints then represented. 2 of them had defects (not in stated condition)

A quick call to the amazon department has resolved most cases wehre the seller refunded a partial amount of the money as i didn't want to bother paying to ship it back.

I'm pretty happy with amazon's dispute system (however i believe it does take 10 days after the first complaint, not sure if that policy changed)


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Posts: 10947 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Chinese cooking, especially Cantonese, does not get the love it deserves. Gloria Bley Miller wrote a good one. After to French, I'll take good Cantonese next.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36395 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have the FL book and might have cooked a few times. The bouchon cookbook on the other hand is beat up and dog eared. Love it, go to it all the time. ad hoc i felt was a waste. i think i might have opened it twice. 'simple family' cooking that takes all day to prepare. Give me the croque-monsieur with fried egg and mornay sauce from bouchon over just about anything in that book. I have a bread plate from bouchon on the wall of my kitchen reminding me to keep things simple.

Hazan is a definite.

I also love the zuni cafe cookbook - filled with great explanations of how's and why's, with some great recipes too.
 
Posts: 1246 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Aug 08, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It's easy to poke fun at Keller's paean to his fabled establishment, but it is a lovely book, educational and authoritative, gorgeously photographed, equally at home on the coffee table or in the kitchen. I read mine cover to cover when I received it as a gift, but have not opened it in the last year, and have only dared attempt a few recipes.

The lowly parmesan crisp became an all-day affair until I discovered that store-bought grated cheese will not work; you must buy a wedge and grate it yourself.

Keller's butter-poaching technique for lobster is clearly superior to, and has now replaced, my previous recipes for steaming or boiling those crustaceans.

I enjoy improvising. If you prefer following a recipe closely, Keller might prove frustrating. Hope this helps.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Javachip,


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Posts: 1085 | Location: San Diego CA | Registered: May 30, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Any book by Hazan is good.

The FL is 'elegant' for the average cook. I'd take teh 75 edition of "The Joy of Cooking" over that.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: E A Bowers [FlWino],


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Posts: 6128 | Location: Palm Beach Gardens FL | Registered: Nov 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hazan is a classic. How could you not have it already? Written before the celebrity and cult chefs appeared, it's still a great cookbook. The second one isn't quite in the same league, but also a great book.

I stopped buying cookbooks about 15 years ago because I already had so many and it's so easy to find recipes online these days. But I'm always tempted by things like that Keller book or in particular the Nathan Myhrvold book. The thing is, you can sit and read those. I'm not going to stand with a book in the kitchen and measure a spoonful of this and a spoonful of that, but the better books serve as places to get suggestions, explanations, and enjoyment. Then you go cook.

Good luck with it!


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Posts: 2471 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for all the input. The comments on the FL cookbook were especially helpful. Somehow I had missed the Bouchon cookbook -- only seeing the Bouchon Bakery one, and I don't bake. That might be closer to what I want than the FL book. Although I improvise on things I cook often, I still don't feel comfortable completely improvising; rather, I choose recipes that sound interesting, follow them pretty much too the tee initially and then make adjustments if I think needed on subsequent preparations.


“Appreciating old wine is like making love to a very old lady. It is possible. It can even be enjoyable. But it requires a bit of imagination.”

Andre Tchelistcheff
 
Posts: 2568 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Jan 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If anyone wants to read FL but does not want to pay the price of admission, I have a PDF.
 
Posts: 1222 | Registered: May 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by AML:
If anyone wants to read FL but does not want to pay the price of admission, I have a PDF.


Got it. Thanks!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Rob_Sutherland,


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OK, I've got your emails...it is going to come in 3 parts, as it exceeds the gmail attachment limits. Use WinRAR to re-assemble.
 
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edabowers at g mail


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Posts: 6128 | Location: Palm Beach Gardens FL | Registered: Nov 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you

This message has been edited. Last edited by: eyesintime,


“Appreciating old wine is like making love to a very old lady. It is possible. It can even be enjoyable. But it requires a bit of imagination.”

Andre Tchelistcheff
 
Posts: 2568 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Jan 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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