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I just enrolled in the Wine Spectator online courses for two reasons: to enhance my travel experiences in Europe (since wine is such an integral part of their culture), and because I wish to be hired at a wine store. I am shopping for supplies and need advice:

I am buying a wine refrigerator. I want to know if I really need to spend the extra cash for one with separate red and white temp sections or if I can keep them together and let the red sit longer before drinking when I take it out?

Do I need 2 separate aerators for white and red or just one?

Do I need a vacuum wine pump?

Anything else I should consider?

Thanks!
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia | Registered: Oct 15, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by HeatherAD:
I just enrolled in the Wine Spectator online courses for two reasons: to enhance my travel experiences in Europe (since wine is such an integral part of their culture), and because I wish to be hired at a wine store. I am shopping for supplies and need advice:

I am buying a wine refrigerator. I want to know if I really need to spend the extra cash for one with separate red and white temp sections or if I can keep them together and let the red sit longer before drinking when I take it out?

One temperature is fine. Separate temperature sections are a waste of money.

Do I need 2 separate aerators for white and red or just one?

One aerator is sufficient.

Do I need a vacuum wine pump?

No. They're virtually useless. If you think you're going to have leftover wine on a frequent basis there are other alternatives, including just sealing the bottle - putting in in the fridge and drinking it the next day after bringing it to proper serving temperature. Use the search function here for additional ideas.

Anything else I should consider?

Most wines that are on shelves are intended for immediate consumption and leaving them at room temps for a few months won't hurt them. Wine fridges are primarily designed for wines that are either meant to be aged for a few years or wines that will be held for a few years before drinking. If neither is the case for you, save the money you'd spend on a fridge and spend it on wine (or travel)

Thanks!


Welcome aboard.

PH
 
Posts: 15066 | Location: Maryland, USA (DC suburbs) | Registered: Nov 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You need a good wine key and a nice, good cotton linen for cleaning your glassware. Oh, and good wine. You'll need good wine!


Ἐν οἴνῳ ἀλήθεια
En Vino Veritas
 
Posts: 289 | Location: New Orleans, LA | Registered: Dec 14, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by HeatherAD:
I just enrolled in the Wine Spectator online courses for two reasons: to enhance my travel experiences in Europe (since wine is such an integral part of their culture),

but Europe is what, a few hundred million people? And half of them don't live in wine countries either. So don't imagine that all Europeans, even those in the south, really care all that much about wine or feel it's such a big part of their cultures. Maybe proportionately more people care than the US, but even so, most don't care nearly as much as some of the people on these boards and they're happy with a beer or something else.

and because I wish to be hired at a wine store.

Travel to Europe isn't a req for being hired. At least not in NYC.

I am shopping for supplies and need advice:

I am buying a wine refrigerator. I want to know if I really need to spend the extra cash for one with separate red and white temp sections or if I can keep them together and let the red sit longer before drinking when I take it out?

What PH said.

Do I need 2 separate aerators for white and red or just one?

None. You can swirl your glass and accomplish the same thing.

Do I need a vacuum wine pump?
What PH said, except that I pour the wien into a 1/2 bottle, cork it and put it in the fridge. Lasts for a while that way. It's the cold that helps.

Anything else I should consider?

Thanks!


In addition to what PH said, if you're really going to buy a fridge, spend for a better quality one instead of a cheap version by Haeier or something like that. They don't seal, the compressors blow out, and you'll end up spending the same money two or three times. And of course, buy something that's huge because you're never going to save a single case of wine for 20 years. But if you're not laying away, his advice is better.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2611 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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enhance my travel experiences in Europe (since wine is such an integral part of their culture)


In part, I can confirm what Greg said. Most people here in Europe don't consider anymore the wine as an element of their alimentation as it was in the past centuries, even in South Europe, and the average person is not a wine geek. However, I would like to offer a different point of view. Wine is indeed an integral part of our culture. Civilization of Europe and its economy were tightly connected to wine (a lot could be said about Greece and Rome). The Dionysiac myths were the ones that really did matter in the ancient times for the common people, and left a huge mark in our culture. Literature (greek tragedy to begin with) used the wine from the beginning to convey concepts and feelings that are now commonplaces. (e.g. we still use the terms Dionysiac vs. Apollonian as a key to interpret the world). In the myth, Dionysus gets eaten and returns to life. The wine in the Holy Mass becomes the blood of Jesus. The vines and the wine are part of countless metaphoras, and can be found in architectural ornaments, paintings, poems from the beginning of Europe up to the present days. So yes, wine and enhancement of your travel experience in Europe can be related. Not so sure though that this will help you in being hired.

I found a book written by Hugh Johnson (The Story of Wine) extremely interesting and not boring at all; for sure, it's less expensive than a travel in Europe, and to me it's invaluable to put the wine in historical context. If this is of any interest for you, I'd recommend you to read it.
 
Posts: 101 | Location: Piedmont | Registered: Jan 11, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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pmng, you need to post here more often!
 
Posts: 2771 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Nov 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One thing I would suggest when purchasing a wine fridge is to try before you buy. Even just for a few minutes. I had one that was so noisy I ended up getting rid of it.

Also, I'm a believer in the wine vacuum pumps. I know a lot of people disagree but I think it causes the wine to last an extra day or two.

Good luck!
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Connecticut | Registered: Jul 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another thing you could use. If purchasing nicer bottles, just as important is learning What You Should Pay. Since the same bottle, depending on even what block you find yourself on, can go for very different prices. https://truebottle.com/index.h...rame=6&excludeterms=
 
Posts: 45 | Registered: Nov 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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recorking an open bottle of wine and putting it back in the cooler is the fastest way to oxidize wine.


--------------
My name is Prince, and I am funky.
 
Posts: 1510 | Location: Napa, Ca | Registered: Jun 30, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am 100% with PurpleHaze and GregT

I have a wine pump, but I never "pump" anymore. I just use the rubber stoppers on the leftovers in my fridge. The pumping doesn't help.

A wine cooling storage unit is only necessary if you'll be keeping bottles for more than a year or two. Otherwise, just store them in a dark closet, away from heat, vibration, and light. A basement is best, if you have one. If you do buy a wine-cooling storage unit, the dual zones are not much use. A single zone is fine. You will have to toss most whites into an ice bath or fridge for a few minutes before serving either way, depending on the grape variety.


Stay thirsty my friends.
 
Posts: 3087 | Location: Saginaw, MI | Registered: Mar 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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