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Please excuse my ignorance as I'm a recent oenophile. Are there distinct flavour characteristics one can generalize about in sub-regions, for example the Medoc and St. Emilion regions of Bordeaux? This would be irrespective of vintage year or producer.
 
Posts: 13 | Location: Ontario | Registered: Mar 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nope.

No doubt people will tell you differently and they'll talk about "Rutherford Dust" and the limestone of Chablis and the volcanic soils of southern Italy and the licorella of Priorat, but you can't taste those things.

What you can generalize about is the general climate, so you know if the wine is from a generally warm region or a cooler one, and you can generalize about the flavor profile due to the grapes. In Europe, as you know, they often specify the allowed grapes, so if something tastes like it's green and weedy and full of band aids, it might be an under-ripe Bordeaux, rather than say, something like Grenache from Ventoux.

People might argue that the "terroir" shows, and that you get a "sense of place", but if that were really true, you wouldn't have to limit yourself to particular grapes and even more, to particular yields, because hey, you should get all that famous terroir in every grape.

That is NOT to say that you can't distinguish one wine from another if you've had enough of the wine, and that the same grapes made into wine by the same winemaker but from another place will taste the same. They won't. But the winemaking, grape, and vintage trump pretty much everything else.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2485 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
Nope.

No doubt people will tell you differently and they'll talk about "Rutherford Dust" and the limestone of Chablis and the volcanic soils of southern Italy and the licorella of Priorat, but you can't taste those things.

What you can generalize about is the general climate, so you know if the wine is from a generally warm region or a cooler one, and you can generalize about the flavor profile due to the grapes. In Europe, as you know, they often specify the allowed grapes, so if something tastes like it's green and weedy and full of band aids, it might be an under-ripe Bordeaux, rather than say, something like Grenache from Ventoux.

People might argue that the "terroir" shows, and that you get a "sense of place", but if that were really true, you wouldn't have to limit yourself to particular grapes and even more, to particular yields, because hey, you should get all that famous terroir in every grape.

That is NOT to say that you can't distinguish one wine from another if you've had enough of the wine, and that the same grapes made into wine by the same winemaker but from another place will taste the same. They won't. But the winemaking, grape, and vintage trump pretty much everything else.

Hey, cdr is back! Smile
 
Posts: 2880 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: Nov 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Funny SD.

I kind of agree with his point. In any event, the poster asked about flavor characteristics and now that I think about itsome people do say the eucalyptus notes in Heitz are distinguishable so that might be an example, although they're not due to the region so much as the other plants someone put there.

BTW, what happened to that poster who double-spaced everything?


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2485 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I miss CDR.

I hope his health did not fail him.
 
Posts: 29586 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
Nope.

No doubt people will tell you differently and they'll talk about "Rutherford Dust" and the limestone of Chablis and the volcanic soils of southern Italy and the licorella of Priorat, but you can't taste those things.

What you can generalize about is the general climate, so you know if the wine is from a generally warm region or a cooler one, and you can generalize about the flavor profile due to the grapes. In Europe, as you know, they often specify the allowed grapes, so if something tastes like it's green and weedy and full of band aids, it might be an under-ripe Bordeaux, rather than say, something like Grenache from Ventoux.

People might argue that the "terroir" shows, and that you get a "sense of place", but if that were really true, you wouldn't have to limit yourself to particular grapes and even more, to particular yields, because hey, you should get all that famous terroir in every grape.

That is NOT to say that you can't distinguish one wine from another if you've had enough of the wine, and that the same grapes made into wine by the same winemaker but from another place will taste the same. They won't. But the winemaking, grape, and vintage trump pretty much everything else.


So GregT, if you tasted blindly you don't think you would be able to tell the difference between a Rutherford Cab and a Howell Mountain Cab? I think the OPs examples St emilion and Medoc are easier because of the high proportion of merlot in the St Emilion.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1471 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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