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Frankly, i've not tried enough wines to be able to calibrate my palate to the pro tasters palates, yet i read a lot in the forums about someone not drinking anything James Laube's rates highly, etc. Can you help me summarizing in general what the following tasters seem to be inclined towards;

James Laube
James Molesworth
Bruce Sanderson
James Suckling
Parker
Stephen Tanzer

As a guideline; XYZ likes, overextracted, fruit bombs approachable young etc.
I am just trying to get a feeling who i should follow. I do buy based on points sometimes so this would be helpful.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1676 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good question. You can pretty much equate Parker with your XYZ example. I look forward to the replies.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 37067 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Your silence is deafening fellow forumites. No help??? You all love them, or hate them, or have no clue what they like???


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1676 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I believe wine+art loves Harvey Steiman and bases his life on his teachings. LOL
 
Posts: 5541 | Location: Aurora, IL | Registered: Jul 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't even know who these people are.

How would you like to follow the tasting notes of Sandy Berkenshire?

Who? Exactly.


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
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Posts: 12440 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
I don't even know who these people are.


Of course you don't; none of them taste that fortified stuff you drink.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1676 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RightBankFan:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
I don't even know who these people are.


Of course you don't; none of them taste that fortified stuff you drink.


;-)


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
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Posts: 12440 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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but seriously, your asking fora subjective opinion on someone else's subjective opinion. Isn't that kind of flawed?

anyway you look at it, you're just gonna have to buy the wine and drink it.


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 12440 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
but seriously, your asking fora subjective opinion on someone else's subjective opinion. Isn't that kind of flawed?

anyway you look at it, you're just gonna have to buy the wine and drink it.


Flawed? Not sure i care. I am asking for advice from people that have tried a lot more than me. I rather do that than be stubborn try to figure out everything myself, strike out and waste tons of money. Its just guidance man.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1676 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RightBankFan:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
but seriously, your asking fora subjective opinion on someone else's subjective opinion. Isn't that kind of flawed?

anyway you look at it, you're just gonna have to buy the wine and drink it.


Flawed? Not sure i care. I am asking for advice from people that have tried a lot more than me. I rather do that than be stubborn try to figure out everything myself, strike out and waste tons of money. Its just guidance man.


If you didn't care, then why would you bother calibrating your palate toa pro taster?

The only person who is knows what a pro taster is tasting is the pro taster himself.

Asking a 3rd party to determine trends about that pro taster's palate should be, is a rather silly exercise.

It'd be marginally more valid to ask "Tell me which taster can I just ignore"


I'd say it'd be even easier to just walk into a store that takes their wine seriously and just ask "What's a bottle that has xxxx characteristics". You can then get to know the store owner/ have a proper discussion / determine if those characteristics are really what you like / know that hte store owner probably has tasted all of it already for you / save you lotsa money for not buying anything and everything.


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 12440 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by RightBankFan:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
but seriously, your asking fora subjective opinion on someone else's subjective opinion. Isn't that kind of flawed?

anyway you look at it, you're just gonna have to buy the wine and drink it.


Flawed? Not sure i care. I am asking for advice from people that have tried a lot more than me. I rather do that than be stubborn try to figure out everything myself, strike out and waste tons of money. Its just guidance man.


If you didn't care, then why would you bother calibrating your palate toa pro taster?

The only person who is knows what a pro taster is tasting is the pro taster himself.

Asking a 3rd party to determine trends about that pro taster's palate should be, is a rather silly exercise.

It'd be marginally more valid to ask "Tell me which taster can I just ignore"


I'd say it'd be even easier to just walk into a store that takes their wine seriously and just ask "What's a bottle that has xxxx characteristics". You can then get to know the store owner/ have a proper discussion / determine if those characteristics are really what you like / know that hte store owner probably has tasted all of it already for you / save you lotsa money for not buying anything and everything.


I meant I don't care if you think it is flawed. And why do you care if my exercise is silly? Just ignore the freaking post man. Your advice regarding the store is a good one. Thanks.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1676 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think g-mans point was that if there was a consensus (vocal minority usually) that XYZ tends to up rate overly extracted fruit bombs, how do you know what an overly extracted fruit bomb is? Until you get out and taste stuff, compare your experience to reviewers notes and community notes, you will have no basis for correlating to any of the comments.

In the end one needs to spend time with others that appreciate wines and share thoughts and experiences. After ~1000 bottles of wine you'll probably start to have a good sense of whos palates you align with, whos reviews ring true for you and what varietals/regions keep exciting you.

So even if you did get through answers to your question, you'd still end up drinking a bunch of wine and deciding whos reviews resonate with your palate and can use as a guidance.

As far as who you should follow, I think the answer you should always get is: your own palate.


If opportunity doesn't knock, build a door.
 
Posts: 473 | Location: Minneapolis | Registered: Aug 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Merengue - I'm sitting home sick or I wouldn't be posting on this thread, but since I don't feel like doing much else . . .

G-man was right - it's pretty much impossible to answer your question. Moreover, what do you do with that answer? Say someone says guy X likes big sweet wine. Do you act on that and avoid anything that guy X likes, or conversely, buy everything that guy X likes? What if it turns out that some random person's assessment of guy X's palate isn't the same as yours?

That really makes zero sense. Since you're looking for an opinion in the first place, why not just start with the opinion of the reviewer of a wine, try a couple wines said reviewer recommends, and make up your own mind.

In addition, there's the matter of posturing and profiling.

Parker for example, picked up a lot of Barolo back in the 1970s and 80s, and has a stash of old-time Rioja. He also gave high ratings to some big, ripe Australian and Spanish wines, not to mention SQN. So does that mean he ONLY likes the latter? Not to defend or criticize him, but he's got a far more catholic palate than most people realize. Moreover, he's probably tasted more widely than any of the others on the list.

In spite of that, it's a certainty that people who taste maybe a hundred wines a year, if that, or who've been in the wine business for maybe three years, will proclaim that Parker has no idea and he's limited in his preferences and he's useless. All that aside, he's stated that the 2007 vintage in S. Rhone is the greatest vintage ever anywhere and he's given James Molesworth a backhanded compliment by teasing him for preferring the 2005, more tannic vintage.

I happen to agree with James, who is a careful and honest taster. But he's been reviewing Argentine wines for a while. Now he's reviewing Bordeaux. So how can you make an evaluation? Wines from Argentina tend, or tended, to be from Mendoza, and most of those tended to be ripe and fruity. Does that mean James only likes ripe and fruity wines? Or does it mean that was his beat and that's what he wrote about?


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2673 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Natalie MacLean-she seems to like what others enjoy Horse


Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
 
Posts: 5853 | Registered: Jan 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You mean like Mishy's movie reviews?


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 37067 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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