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Pronouncing the Chateaux of Bordeaux correctly
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French pronunciation can be tricky. This website has some helpful audio clips:

http://www.smallbarrels.com/bo...-pronunciation-guide


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
Posts: 1905 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I want a CD of that lady just reciting those names. The way she says "Suduiraut" ... Damn!


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Posts: 7218 | Location: Santa Clara Valley AVA | Registered: Jul 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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She damn near gave me a chub!
 
Posts: 5516 | Location: Aurora, IL | Registered: Jul 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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chateau la grange is better


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Posts: 12330 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh my! This reminds me when Jerry found the erotic tape Elaine left in the club for him to find.

Wait, I must listen to Clos de l'Oratoire again. Cool
 
Posts: 30249 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was going to say something, but you got it.


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Posts: 1905 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Punch it , Chewie!
 
Posts: 1386 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Jul 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I play these over and over before crying myself to sleep nightly.


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Posts: 2645 | Location: Edmonton | Registered: Feb 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The more I listened to her speak, the more I became like Gomez Addams when Morticia speaks to him in French! Oh, Cara Mia!


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Posts: 1905 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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very sexy voice.


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Posts: 6619 | Location: Montreal | Registered: Feb 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Mounseiur Soup,

Excellent website, thanks.

I was laughing at all the comments and not only were they funny, they were spot on. "Le chub" is right!


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Posts: 400 | Location: Carlsbad, CA, USA | Registered: Jul 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Late reply, but if anyone is still paying attention, I believe it is a dialect or old pronounciation of Cos, specific to Cos d'Estournel. It's a traditional pronounication that is still used. French, like English, has many exceptions to the rules, this being one of them. Normally, the s at the end of a sentance is silent unless it is followed by an e, or if the next word in a sentence begins with a vowel, then the s sounds like a -z.
 
Posts: 1201 | Location: SLC,UT | Registered: Jan 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Roentgen Ray:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Late reply, but if anyone is still paying attention, I believe it is a dialect or old pronounciation of Cos, specific to Cos d'Estournel. It's a traditional pronounication that is still used. French, like English, has many exceptions to the rules, this being one of them. Normally, the s at the end of a sentance is silent unless it is followed by an e, or if the next word in a sentence begins with a vowel, then the s sounds like a -z.


Yes. You are correct. The "s" at the end of Cos D'estournel is pronounced(ie not silent) unlike Cos Labory which is silent. No rule, just tradition as RR mentioned.


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Posts: 6619 | Location: Montreal | Registered: Feb 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bump - newbies might want to have a listen.
 
Posts: 5516 | Location: Aurora, IL | Registered: Jul 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hey, does anyone have Suckling's email address? He might want to listen before doing another video!


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Posts: 2654 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Les Forts de Latour is the best in my mind...


Looking forward to those mags of '08 Salon.
 
Posts: 2446 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Les Forts de Latour and La Tour Blanche hands down. Wish my elementary school french teacher sounded like this, I might have learned something.
 
Posts: 88 | Registered: Jan 28, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bump, because knowledge and beauty should not remain hidden.


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Posts: 1905 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Roentgen Ray:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
That site is awesome!

One thing I'm confused about is that she pronouces Cos d'Estournel with a hard s at the end of Cos, but she pronounces Cos Labory with a silent s.

Interesting also that they Franco-sized Palmer. I wondered if they would do the same with Leoville Barton, but that wasn't included.


Late reply, but if anyone is still paying attention, I believe it is a dialect or old pronounciation of Cos, specific to Cos d'Estournel. It's a traditional pronounication that is still used. French, like English, has many exceptions to the rules, this being one of them. Normally, the s at the end of a sentance is silent unless it is followed by an e, or if the next word in a sentence begins with a vowel, then the s sounds like a -z.


This is true, and sometimes it depends on both local habits and indivudal habits..I guess all the pronouciations are fine, as long as the listening bodys well understand !
 
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Remember that Bordeaux was once an English possession, and the historical development of the Bordeaux wine trade is deeply intertwined with the English. Many of the current or former owners have deep British roots. Therefore, it is not suprising that some of the oldest and most famous estates have an Anglicized aspect to their name.

Burgundy is the opposite, as it is landlocked and was insulated from essentially all British influence, so the names are purely French.


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Posts: 3169 | Location: Saginaw, MI | Registered: Mar 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Awesome site. Thanks for the link.


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Posts: 5040 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: Nov 14, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Primordialsoup:
French pronunciation can be tricky. This website has some helpful audio clips:

http://www.smallbarrels.com/bo...-pronunciation-guide


Time to bump this for the newbies! Smile
 
Posts: 5516 | Location: Aurora, IL | Registered: Jul 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Love it. Thanks for the bump!

On a similar note, you can find audio clips for every Burgundy appellation here. Not as convenient as the Bordeaux site, but still very useful. I think the Burgundy appellation names are easier to mispronounce than Bordeaux.

http://www.bourgogne-wines.com...-nuits,225,168.html?

That link is for the Côte de Nuits. The links to the pages for the Côte de Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise, Chablis, Mâconnais and Chatillonais are at the top of the right-hand column.

Scroll down on each of those pages, and you'll find links for each appellation. Click through on each appellations, and the audio clips are in the right hand column below the maps. Male and female.


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