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Hello, my name is Shawn and my wife and I just joined here to learn more about premium wines. We are long time wine drinkers, but mostly of what I call "grocery store" wines. We drink mostly reds and mostly Australian wines but we just purchased a wine cooler and are looking to buy some wines to age. So here is my question:

What factor(s) determine whether a red wine is a candidate for aging or not aging?

Be gentle - my first post and first question...
Thanks
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Mar 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Structure and balance would be what I look for in aging a wine. I would also make sure that I liked the flavours and aromatic notes that are present in wines that have been aged before I head down that path.
 
Posts: 1316 | Registered: May 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For reds, at least.

Some types of wine are just made that way. Bordeaux, Burgundy, Barolo, Barbaresco, Brunello and many other styles all benefit from bottle age in good vintages.

Balance, as AML says. Acidity, fruit and tannin should be present in a balance that lends itself to longevity. A serious lack of any of these components, or an overwhelming amount of one in relation to the others may cause the wine to peter out early or not be worth laying down.

I would recommend going verrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrry slowly on filling your cooler with wines you plan on aging for any length of time. Taste, taste, taste and taste some more. If you're thinking of aging wine, taste aged wines now. Although changes in winemaking in recent years may mean that the aged wines of today will be different than the aged wines that you'll have in your cooler 20 years from now, at least you'll get some idea if you like "old" wine.

Welcome and good luck.

PH

This message has been edited. Last edited by: PurpleHaze,
 
Posts: 15312 | Location: Maryland, USA (DC suburbs) | Registered: Nov 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would like to give a big +1 to the comment about building your holdings SLOWLY.
 
Posts: 1316 | Registered: May 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sosorfla:
What factor(s) determine whether a red wine is a candidate for aging or not aging?


For a beginner the two most important factors are producer's track record and vintage.
You can easily determine those by asking around and without pulling corks.


http://scmwine.info
 
Posts: 7218 | Location: Santa Clara Valley AVA | Registered: Jul 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sosorfla:
So here is my question:

What factor(s) determine whether a red wine is a candidate for aging or not aging?


Hi Shawn. Assuming quite every strong french reds can be aged properly, you have to consider its %vol power as the more it is, the more wine can resist to aging and getting nobler and more complex aromas.
Second point: most of the producers can tell you which of their vintages fit better (because they often make age tests) for ageing, always ask before valuing a purchase. Third point: not only reds are suited for ageing. Even some italian and spanish white can age with success. Two years ago I assisted to a tasting of 10 yrs old Cortese di Gavi tasting (10 yrs older than what previous common opinion granted for it). Every bottles tasted resulted exceptional, behaving like noble reds which add precious hints to their scent and flavour.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: The Wine Wanderer,


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My blog on savoir vivre in Piedmont

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Posts: 23 | Location: Torino | Registered: Apr 04, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I can't say that I agree with all of the points being made.

PH makes the best one, goto a respected store, find an already aged bottle and try it. See if you even like aged wine.

I've opened some fairly impressive white burgs with just a touch of madeirization that tasted beautifully, only to have family friends give me a weird face and tell me that it taste weird.

I've opened some impressive cali cabs and bordeauxs that i 've felt still had fruit/balance and body only to be told both other friends that "this stinks", or "this tastes like mold".

So to each his own.

Though, I'd doubt the comment about aging wines getting more intense anything. Wine fades or changes, it doesn't get more intense with age.


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Posts: 12355 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Don't listen to this G-Man character Smile
 
Posts: 7448 | Location: Long Island, NY | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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oops almost forgot.

Welcome to the boards!!! Big Grin
 
Posts: 7448 | Location: Long Island, NY | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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don't listen to anyone from long island, something funny in the water!! =)


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
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Posts: 12355 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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