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I like Pinot Noir a lot and I drink it both from Oregon and California. My Burgundy exposure has been extremely limited and virtually none existent. I have limited my self to some basic Drouhin Cote de Beaune Villages, Domaine Faiveley Mercurey, Frederic Magnien Nuits St Georges. The Drouhin isn't bad but it is nothing special, the Mercurey I did not like that much and the Nuits St Georges had a funk to it that appeared corked but I have to say seemed to have more potential than the other two.

I really don't want to spend $50 plus to continue on a trial and error basis with better quality wines.

Today, I received an offer for 2006 Bouchard Ainee Premier Cru Clos du Roi which appears to be a step up from what i have been drinking. On pricing it is on my strike zone (less than $30).

Anybody have some input on this wine and others I may try at around 25-30 bucks or should I just give up until my disposable income allows me to "gamble"?

Thanks for your advice.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1460 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are planty of sturdy Burgundies available in the $25-30 range, but a "wow" Burgundy in that price range is the proverbial needle in the haystack. I'd suggest trying a number of the less expensive Burgundies to get a base from which to explore. My problem with Burgundy is that there are many expensive wines that disappoint. Of course, when you hit it right, you'll hopefully feel the disappointments were an acceptable price of admission.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36404 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Honestly I'd say give up. Anything under $30 is likely to be so so at best. Poking around is as you've discovered hit and miss and makes a $30 wine you like cost $180 for the 5 you hated.

Best thing you can do is get to any and all retailer tastings or events with Burgundy being poured. Drink someoneelses wine. Even if there's a fee it will work out better than drinking random bottles.

I think the key to Burgundy is to find a producer you like (who doesn't break the bank). I'm not a fan of either Faively or Drouhin. In that class of huge producers I think Brouchard is better than those two, but not by much and Jadot would be the best, by a lot.

Magien I've liked, if you suspect a bad bottle, he'd be worth another try. Other's I like include: Perrot Minot, Vincent Girardin, and Dominique Laurent. Again being frank, when I meet someone who has more than 5-6 Burgundy producers in their cellar, I figure they are buying on some other basis besides personal taste. (points, prestige, something).

Everyone I listed uses new oak to some extent, and some people won't recommend them on moral/religious grounds for that reason.


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7532 | Location: San Jose | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think that Beaune wines are a great place to start. They tend to be accessible, both in profile and on the pocketbook. One of my old stand-by wines is the Savigny les Beaune from Benjamin Leroux. Depending on the place, it usually retails in my area from $35.99-$39.99. Worth the extra fiver if you ask me.

I also enjoy the wines of Camille Giroud, Domaine Thierry & Pascal Matrot, and Vincent & Sophie Morey. They are all around the $30-35 price range, and are quite enjoyable now, imho.


Ἐν οἴνῳ ἀλήθεια
En Vino Veritas
 
Posts: 289 | Location: New Orleans, LA | Registered: Dec 14, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I'm not a fan of either Faively or Drouhin.

Agree completely, and add Jadot.

Magien I've liked, if you suspect a bad bottle, he'd be worth another try.

Assuming you mean Frederic, I agree completely.

Other's I like include: Perrot Minot, Vincent Girardin, and Dominique Laurent.

Laurent would be my pick from that group.


Others that have been very impressive recently were Gerard Raphet (outstanding!), Remoissenet, and Rene Leclerc.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36404 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Board-o and Stefania.

Regarding, Perrot Minot, Vincent Girardin, Dominique Laurent, Gerard Raphet, Remoissenet, and Rene Leclerc.

Are these widely available in the US? Any specific bottling i should look for? Villages, 1er Cru etc???

Thanks again.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1460 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A specific bottling is hard to recommend since any one specific modestly priced Burgundy can be hard to find. Remoissenet's 2009 barrel samples were impressive. Gerard Raphet's 2007 and 2008 bottlings were all extremely good. Every one we tasted.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36404 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Perrot Minot is on the expensive end now. Morey St Denis bottlings are in the $90 range now for most bottles and other stuff is $200+ Best bet is to look for older bottles at auction. Christophe took over winemaking in 1996 and the critics didn't discover him until the 2003 vintage. Means anything between 1996 and 2002 doesn't have a rating attached and can be secured at a lower price.

Girardin has good availability in the US. His wines from Corton and Gevery should fit your price bill.

Laurent used to be available everywhere but less so now. He's out of favor with the oak nazi's so prices are cheap but I think less is imported.

Remoissenet I also like but that's really hard to find at least on the west coast and at the high end on price. Well high end of what you wanted to pay, compared to others from the same sources he's a bargain,but the bottle we see most in the US is Chambertin and it's $200+


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7532 | Location: San Jose | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:


Laurent used to be available everywhere but less so now. He's out of favor with the oak nazi's so prices are cheap but I think less is imported.



Big Grin...I think I might be an oak Nazi, but I'm a fan of Laurent wines. Wink
 
Posts: 29530 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
Honestly I'd say give up. Anything under $30 is likely to be so so at best. Poking around is as you've discovered hit and miss and makes a $30 wine you like cost $180 for the 5 you hated.

Best thing you can do is get to any and all retailer tastings or events with Burgundy being poured. Drink someoneelses wine. Even if there's a fee it will work out better than drinking random bottles.

I think the key to Burgundy is to find a producer you like (who doesn't break the bank). I'm not a fan of either Faively or Drouhin. In that class of huge producers I think Brouchard is better than those two, but not by much and Jadot would be the best, by a lot.

Magien I've liked, if you suspect a bad bottle, he'd be worth another try. Other's I like include: Perrot Minot, Vincent Girardin, and Dominique Laurent. Again being frank, when I meet someone who has more than 5-6 Burgundy producers in their cellar, I figure they are buying on some other basis besides personal taste. (points, prestige, something).

Everyone I listed uses new oak to some extent, and some people won't recommend them on moral/religious grounds for that reason.


This is truly a brilliant post. Covers all the issues (you didn't mention chaptalization, another thing with religious overtones) and sums things up neatly. I have plenty of friends who swear by Burgundy but I swear they spend more time explaining why this or that one didn't show so well than they do actually enjoying the wine.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2472 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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lub my henri gouge


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Posts: 10950 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:


Laurent used to be available everywhere but less so now. He's out of favor with the oak nazi's so prices are cheap but I think less is imported.



Big Grin...I think I might be an oak Nazi, but I'm a fan of Laurent wines. Wink


I've never found his wines over oaked, but then it's been written that he uses up to 200% new oak, and you know if it's been written the wines must suck. Unless it's Leroy using 200% oak because her wines are great, even if they do suck. Lots of group think in the Burgundy crowd.


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7532 | Location: San Jose | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For those of you with a preference for minimal oak, I suggest the Northern Rhones of Rene Rostaing. I believe Rene said he uses only neutral oak. If it's not 100% neutral, it's certainly overwhelmingly neutral. When we discussed American wines, he very politely showed his disdain for the use of new oak. I love his wines, both red and white. His 2009 Condrieu La Bonnette is by far the best Condrieu I've ever tasted and one of the greatest white wines I've ever tasted. Unfortunately, only 20 cases arte being imported into the US and I'm afraid w+a will snag a substantial portion. Devilish


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36404 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:

I love his wines, both red and white. His 2009 Condrieu La Bonnette is by far the best Condrieu I've ever tasted and one of the greatest white wines I've ever tasted. Unfortunately, only 20 cases arte being imported into the US and I'm afraid w+a will snag a substantial portion. Devilish


NOTE TO SELF! Cool

The Dallas market sees a lot of Rostaing wines. I will email the buyer at the local retailer and inquire.
 
Posts: 29530 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
For those of you with a preference for minimal oak, I suggest the Northern Rhones of Rene Rostaing. I believe Rene said he uses only neutral oak. If it's not 100% neutral, it's certainly overwhelmingly neutral. When we discussed American wines, he very politely showed his disdain for the use of new oak. I love his wines, both red and white. His 2009 Condrieu La Bonnette is by far the best Condrieu I've ever tasted and one of the greatest white wines I've ever tasted. Unfortunately, only 20 cases arte being imported into the US and I'm afraid w+a will snag a substantial portion. Devilish


Unfortunately he denied my request for tasting due to the ridiculous reason of him harvesting his grapes or something. Lame.
 
Posts: 1225 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'd recommend Domaine Fourrier or Dujac Fils et Pere as two producers who are reliable, produce Burgundy with appelation typicity and where there are some reasonably priced offerings.

These will not be 1er or Grand Cru but they show the nuances of their village and can be cellared short term.

Fourrier has some magnificent 1er and Grand Cru wines but not at such a low price point. Similarly trading "up" to Domaine Dujac also demonstrates a leap in quality over the negociant wines.

Typically you will find that these Burgundies will be paler, have more noticeable acidity and less robust flavours on the soft red fruit side than Californian (and Oreggon) Pinot Noir. However part of their charm is the subtlety of the fragrances and the ability to pair well with food.


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Posts: 385 | Location: United Kingdom | Registered: Mar 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Burgundy is so diversified..the best way to really develop a true opinion and knowledge should be to start from good basic wines like "Bourgogne" alone. Some of them are really interesting and grown in barrels. Prices in France for those wines are below 10$.
Then level up to "Village" wines like Mercurey, Givry, Monthelie which are still of reasonable price (<15$ locally). Only after I would go for more prestigious bottles (Villages from Cotes de Nuits Gevrey Chambertin/Morey St Denis/Chambolle-Musigny/Vosne Romanée... or Premiers Crus and Grands Crus). I would avoid the main wholesale houses...of course their wine will easier to find, especially outside Europe, but I'm strongly convinced it's worth drinking Burgundy wine coming from one of the 4000 traditional producers. !
 
Posts: 10 | Registered: Nov 24, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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