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Hi, i need your help regarding serving temperature for a 1997 sauternes and also what is the best type of glass to serve it? I don't want to buy a special set of glasses as i just don't drink it enough. I am planning to serve it alongside a foei gras. Should this be popped and poured as well or slow ox? Thanks.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1587 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I typically serve my Sauternes straight out of the cellar and let it warm from there. Any colder than 55-57 and you'll lose nuance, imo.....

I use white wine stems, and they work just fine. If you have an option, I'd go wider than narrower.

I'm a pop and pour guy with most Sauternes. Which bottle are you opening?

PH
 
Posts: 15108 | Location: Maryland, USA (DC suburbs) | Registered: Nov 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks. I was betwwen an 05 Rieussec or a 97 Suiduirat. Have decided for the Suiduirat given it has a bit more age. Thoughts?


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1587 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hard to go wrong with either. If they're 375s, open 'em both!! Cool

Unlike many, I really enjoy Sauternes young, so I wouldn't hesitate to open the Rieussec. It's probably the better wine of the two.....

PH
 
Posts: 15108 | Location: Maryland, USA (DC suburbs) | Registered: Nov 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I prefer a Sauvignon Blanc glass, which I believe is essentially the same thing as a dessert stem.

Coincidentally, we served an '03 Lafaurie-Peyraguey to some guests last night and it was excellent. Smile


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Posts: 6114 | Location: Utah | Registered: Jan 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
Hard to go wrong with either. If they're 375s, open 'em both!! Cool

Unlike many, I really enjoy Sauternes young, so I wouldn't hesitate to open the Rieussec. It's probably the better wine of the two.....

PH


I am sure you are probably right. Thinking back i should have shipped both but the Rieussec is still at the store. Smack It will come in my next shipment.
BTW just bought some 09 Guiraud yesterday.

I have SB Schott Swiezel glasses so i'll use those.

Any other opinions regarding pnp vrs slow ox?


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1587 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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i'm a drink sauternes young guy too.

if i wanted all that other stuff, I'd drink madiera or a tawny.


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Posts: 12119 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A agree with PH on the white stems. Special glasses are great if you have Sauternes often but a smaller white wine stem works great (cabernet stem shape but smaller)

If poured in smaller portions the tend to warm up quickly in the glass so I do chill them a bit (not as much as Icewine). I've decanted them and left the decanter on ice with great results.

Young/old, in between each has it's allure. I really enjoy the big fruit bursting from young Sauternes, especially those without really big botrytis.

Some older ones get too dark in colour and taste for my tastes. The 1989 and 1962 D'Yquem are like this - dominant burnt sugar to the point of losing complexity. Other older Sauternes can have incredibilt complexity: 1983 D'Yquem, 1983 Gilette come to mind. A 1976 Roumieu popped n poured at an offline recently was fantastic.

Other older Sauternes lack the dark spicy or caramel notes of some but seem to soften and become beautifully balanced. The 1970 Suduiraut is like this - not big but very smooth and balanced.

A year ago I opened 1975 and 2005 Tour Blanche at a dinner (both from 750s). The 1975 while lighter was good but the 2005, with lemon curd, light vanilla bursting from the glass and superb balance.

Other that stand out in the last year are 1990 and 2001 Guiraud.

Finally some seem to be at their best young. The 2005 Lamoth Guignard is like this - still excellent now but was amazing for the price when released.

So, my thought is to simply enjoy them, and don't save them just for dessert or a cheese course. At one dinner a couple of years ago I started with the 1954 Gilette and we finished with the 1983, and still had some of the 54 in a glass at the end. It had evolved over the course of the evening.

Enjoy!
 
Posts: 1894 | Location: Etobicoke (Toronto burb) | Registered: Apr 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Paging PH!!
So PH I did get also some 2003 Guiraud and the plan is to open it alongside the Suduirat 97. Suggestions?? Young first, then the Suduirat? Vice versa? Botth at the same time and let the people gravitate to their preferred?

What would you do? Again this is to serve early alongside artesanal french foei gras!


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1587 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'd serve them together. It'll be fun to compare the young and the older wine. Both should be smashing with the foie. Jealous!

PH
 
Posts: 15108 | Location: Maryland, USA (DC suburbs) | Registered: Nov 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks, will do that. Happy thanksgiving.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1587 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Merengue:
Thanks, will do that. Happy thanksgiving.


Too you too. Enjoy!

PH
 
Posts: 15108 | Location: Maryland, USA (DC suburbs) | Registered: Nov 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So which did you prefer? Very different vintages.

Chateau Guiraud has a relatively high percentage of Savu Blanc - something around 30 to 35 percent, while most other houses use much more Sémillon - Château Suduiraut is like around 90%. I don't know if it's the SB or not, but while I like them both, I really like the Guiraud.

The 2003 vintage often had less botrytis with some of the sweetness coming from the heat, whereas 97 was a more purely botrytized vintage, and to me the better of the two.

We considered Sauterned for Thanksgiving, since I don't have a lot of sweet American wine, but we eventually opened a 2000 Tokaji Aszú instead.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2622 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While both were delicious, the general concensus among 5 of the 6 drinkers was that the Guiraud was the better wine. We felt it was a bit more complex with some earthiness (maybe from the botrytis) while the Suduirat had a waxy texture that was unique but it felt just a tad hot and needed a bit more acidity. Perhaps I just lean to younger sauternes.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1587 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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