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Tasting 2 of 6; M. Does Burgundy
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I'll start things off with some notes from lunch earlier in the day, leading in to the notes from the dinner in the evening. Everything was served blind. My one takeaway is that I don't know shit about fuck. Burgundy is a strange a mysterious place. Polar opposite opinions were common place, as well as Village and generic Bourgogne wines out performing Grand Crus. Very interesting tasting.

PRE-SUPER TASTING LUNCH - Terroni, Toronto, Canada (1/26/2013)

  • 2008 Ferrando Carema White Label (Etichetta Bianca) - Italy, Piedmont, Northern Piedmont, Carema
    Popped and poured, followed over approximately 1 hour. Deep ruby in the glass, translucent. A classical Nebbiolo nose, showing red and black cherry, tar, florals, spice, earth, with a touch of mentol and pine, as well as a hint of leather, perhaps giving a glimpse in to the future of this wine. On the palate, tart cherries, dried rose petals, baking spice, and earth. The mouthfeel is quite sleek and light, a nod to its classical nose, as this does not have the over extraction that many overtly modern Barolo exhibit. The finish is moderate, slightly dry with mild tannin, but also somewhat mouthwatering at the same time due to the brisk acid profile. Drinking surprisingly well now, but I think this could round out a little further with some upside with some time in the cellar. A great way to kick off lunch. (91 pts.)
  • 2010 Tenute Rubino Marmorelle Salento IGT - Italy, Puglia, Salento IGT
    Popped and poured, followed for approximately one hour. This was a stark contrast to the Barolo, showing a much riper and darker fruit profile on the nose; candied blueberry, blackberry, spice, and dried herbs. On the palate, again, showing a much riper style, with a round, voluptuous mouthfeel, but still exhibiting a nice balance of tannin and acid. Finish is moderate, accentuated by blueberry preserves and spice. Not overly complex, or impressive, but was decent with pizza. (86 pts.)
  • 2009 Luigi Giusti Lacrima di Morro d'Alba - Italy, Marche, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba
    Popped and poured, followed for about 30 minutes, as this was a late addition. Deep purple in the glass. Certainly the most expressive wine of the meal, but whether one may like the characteristics is another story. Out of the gates, this was a little strange, but settled down, showing some dark fruits, blueberries, lavender, violets, white pepper, citrus peel and a touch of leather. On the palate, this is a big wine, but much more streamlined than the previous wine, with tastes of blueberry, dried flowers, pepper and citrus rounding out the moderate length finish. I prefer the 2007 vintage of this wine, but this was still quite enjoyable off the list. (89 pts.)


SUPER TASTING 2 OF 6; MACIEJ DOES BURGUNDY - Bosk, Toronto, Canada (1/26/2013)

Flight 1
  • 1993 Faiveley Mazis-Chambertin - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Mazis-Chambertin Grand Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with a mild brick. Off the bat, this struck me as the oldest wine of the flight. On the nose, red fruits, a touch of stink, beef stock, soy, ginger, pomegranate, baking spice, stems, and with some air, some notes of mushroom, undergrowth a coffee grinds emerge. On the palate, a very luxurious mouthfeel, that finishes a touch dry. Brisk acidity keeps this quite fresh, not belying its age. The finish is moderate, albeit, seeming a touch clipped due to the drying tannin. With time, this faded a bit in the glass. (92 pts.)
  • 1996 Faiveley Corton-Clos des Cortons Faiveley - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Corton Grand Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with the slightest brick at the rim; seemingly the youngest of the flight. This had very soaring and lifted aromatics on the nose, showing fresh pomegranate, grapefruit, cherry, florals, earth, crushed rocks, spice, with just a touch of undergrowth developing. Not as complex as the first wine of the flight, but a very pure expression of fruit. On the palate, a nice sappy richness to the fruit, with a silky mouthfeel, and mouth puckering acidity on the finish. Tannic structure is still fairly prominent. I would give this 10 years in the cellar, for a bit more upside. (93+ pts.)
  • 1999 Faiveley Chambertin-Clos de Bèze - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with hardly any brick, seemingly contradicting the nose, which had what seemed like a touch of oxidation out of the gate. Over time, this seemed to settle down a bit, giving way to aromas of dried strawberries, twizzlers, earth, decaying leaves and spice. On the palate, not getting any oxidative notes, with some red fruit, tea leaves, and spice rounding out the moderate finish. Mouthfeel has fairly rich, with some moderate tannin and acidity. To me this was in a bit of a weird spot and rather puzzling, but still a pleasure to drink. (90 pts.)

Flight 2
  • 1996 Domaine G. Roumier / Christophe Roumier Chambolle-Musigny - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambolle-Musigny
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with a mild brick. On the nose, this was the darkest in fruit profile so far, showing some dark cherry, a touch of seaweed, florals, earth, spice, undergrowth, crushed rocks, pickled ginger, and a touch of brown sugar with time. On the palate, nice red fruits, earth, baking spice and dried tea leaves. Structurally, showing moderate tannin and acidity, with a medium length finish. (92 pts.)
  • 1998 Faiveley Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru Clos de la Maréchale - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with a moderate brick. On the nose, this almost mirrors how the third wine of the first flight started, in that it is seemingly a touch oxidized. Lightly bruised apple, dried red fruits, spice, decaying leaves and earth are the predominant aromas. On the palate, this is a a touch astringent, with tastes of dried fruit, mineral, tea leaves and a bit of baking spice. The finish has a metallic note and is a bit clipped with some harsh tannin and aforementioned astringency. This was not particularly pleasing and the table opted not to drink this. Either this was not a representative bottle, or it should have been consumed 5 years ago. NR (flawed)
  • 1996 Comte Armand Pommard 1er Cru Clos des Epeneaux - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Pommard 1er Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Deep garnet in the glass, with a slight brick. My glass appears a bit murky. On the nose, deep black cherry, seaweed/sea air, earth, crushed rocks, iodine, leather, baking spice, and a touch of mint. On the palate, this shows a nice richness, perhaps pushing the boundaries a bit, but still immensely enjoyable. While this shows some age, there are still some moderate tannin, complimented by balanced acidity. The finish is moderate and characterized by red and black cherry, earth, mineral and dried herb. Overall, this is fairly muscular, but still maintains a certain level of restraint and elegance. (95+ pts.)
  • 2000 Faiveley Chambertin-Clos de Bèze - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Deep ruby in the glass, with a mild brick. On the nose, a very predominant mineral component, complimented by the typical red fruit, earth and spice notes, rounded out by some gorgeous florals, grated ginger, undergrowth and a touch of iodine. On the palate, good concentration, with a svelte texture. This is really fresh, with nice tart acidity, finishing quite dry. This seems a touch unbalanced at the moment, so I'd stick it in the cellar and hope for a bit of upside. Overall, a wonderful nose, but falls short on the palate. (92+? pts.)

Flight 3
  • 2002 Faiveley Corton-Clos des Cortons Faiveley - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Corton Grand Cru
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, not showing much in the way of age. I suspect this is quite young. On the nose, this is fairly fruit forward, showing waxy red fruit, cranberry, baking spices, crushed rocks and floral note. On the palate, this is still a bit tight, but gives way to some cranberry, beeswax, mineral and earth flavours. Tannic structure is still in the forefront, and acidity is brisk and quite fresh. This has a lot of potential but needs some time. (93+ pts.)
  • 1996 Mongeard-Mugneret Bourgogne - France, Burgundy, Bourgogne
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with a heavy brick, moderate sediment; noticeably aged. On the nose, this was quite advanced, but not at all oxidative, showing nice dried cherry, dried pomegranate, earth, decaying leaves, earth, iodine, spent coffee grinds, dried herbs and spice. On the palate, very svelte, light, fully resolved, show just a touch of mild tannin on the moderate length finish. This seemed to be the most mature wine of the evening. In a nice spot, but definitely time to drink up. (93 pts.)
  • 1996 Georges Lignier et Fils Chambolle-Musigny - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambolle-Musigny
    Uncorked approximately 30 minutes before service, served blind. Garnet in the glass, with a mild brick. On the nose, typical aromas of red fruit, spice, but also a touch of pyrazine, opening up to reveal a nice earthy base, leather, pomegranate and brown sugar. Aromatically, this was like a blend of the last two wines. On the palate, showing a bit of age, with fairly integrated tanin, moderate acidity, with nice sappy red fruits and earth rounding out the finish. In a good spot right now. (93 pts.)
 
Posts: 1280 | Registered: May 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice notes and a nice tasting! I have never been a fan of Faiveley and don't buy any of their wines anymore. I love Mongeard-Mugneret's wines and have visited and tyasted at the winery. 93 points for a 16 year old Bourgogne says a lot about the winery!


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36743 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for your comments. I had never had much Faiveley prior to this tasting, and based on the results encountered, I would probably not seek them out. While all the wines were well made, none of them were truly exceptional.

I must admit we were all dumbfounded when the foil came off the bottles, and one of our top wines of the night was a Bourgogne LOL

This event was somewhat double blind for the host as well. He knew the subset of about 50 bottles, but had his wife go pick out 10 for the dinner.
 
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This was a killer night....great burgundy. My faves were the roumier, comte armand and the Lignier.
Notes will follow as I am in Europe right now. I must say that it is tough tasting burgundy blind and i almost think that it is more informative to taste these wines non-blind as context is so important.
having said all that.....the 2nd dinner or our dinner group certainly lived up to the hype and i hope to continue the awesome-ness with my dinner on march 9 Smile
 
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SUPER TASTING 2 OF 6 - MACIEJ - Bosk Restaurant, Toronto, On (1/26/2013)

A great tasting of mixed burgs spanning 1993 - 2002. Good mix running from Bourgognes all the way up to Grand Crus, focused on the house of Faiveley. All wines were tasted blind and revealed all at once at the end. Food was great with a Sablefish entrée that was otherworldly.

I believe I have most of the wines listed correctly here, though with so many similar names in burgundy I may have have reported some incorrectly.
  • 1993 Faiveley Mazis-Chambertin - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Mazis-Chambertin Grand Cru
    (tasted blind) Really showing character right out of the gates. Seems to have some age on it. Some stink, lots of earth, a touch of stems and plants. Lots of beef stock and soy. What a lovely wine aged to a point where it strikes and excellent balance. Great palate that is alive and well and is beautifully integrated. fabulous nose that smells like meat right off the grill which gave suggestions from the group of Gevery-Chambertin. Seemed to fade a bit with more air. (93 pts.)
  • 1996 Faiveley Corton-Clos des Cortons Faiveley - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Corton Grand Cru
    (tasted blind - labelled B) Younger than A and has a more reticent nose. Palate is tannic, firm and structured; give it some time. After it opens it reveals lovely strawberry fruit. Just a touch green and some minerals but very pleasant. Dave thought this might be a Vone-Romanee. With air time grapefruit and pomegranate became evident. Quite lovely with great potential. 92++ Points. (92 pts.)
  • 1999 Faiveley Chambertin-Clos de Bèze - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru
    (tasted blind - labelled C) Pretty nose, though marred by being a touch candied and confected and became somewhat closed after some time. Structure is just starting to integrate. Cherry fruited with loads of red licorice. Some tea leaf and coca bean. Perplexed by this, I don't love it but others at the table did. (91 pts.)

  • 1996 Domaine G. Roumier / Christophe Roumier Chambolle-Musigny - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambolle-Musigny
    (tasted blind - labelled D) Initially nose featured a bit of a compost note (it blew off) with soy and ginger. Lovely palate that's just beginning to integrate. All kinds of red fruit, strawberry, watermelon, bright red cherries. This is quite a fruit forward burg, especially after some air. Toward the end it struck me as one dimensional and fruity. (92 pts.)
  • 1998 Faiveley Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru Clos de la Maréchale - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru
    (tasted blind - labelled E) This bottle came across as one of the more mature of the evening. Even for me who prefers a more mature style this seemed to be pushing it with something akin to a banana note that I find off putting. With air it fell of the edge and the nose produced an Iron note. Even then there was plenty to be enjoyed in this bottle and on it's own would have been nice, just didn't quite stand up to the rest fof the lineup. (91 pts.)
  • 1996 Comte Armand Pommard 1er Cru Clos des Epeneaux - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Pommard 1er Cru
    (tasted blind - labelled F) Wow! Here we have a stunner. Love that nose. Dark cherries and quite meaty. Andrew called this one Pommard blind, kudos! I think it's at the early stages of maturity and has plenty of life ahead. This really is spectacular. (95 pts.)
  • 2000 Faiveley Chambertin-Clos de Bèze - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambertin-Clos de Bèze Grand Cru
    (tasted blind - labelled G) Another quite stunning nose off the bat. Great combination of primary, secondary and tertiary notes; in a great spot. Nice incense note and a long balanced palate. (94 pts.)

  • 2002 Faiveley Corton-Clos des Cortons Faiveley - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Corton Grand Cru
    (tasted blind - labelled H) This wine has a huge soaring super complex nose and ended up becoming my WOTN. Huge young nose loaded with cinnamon and nutmeg, everything is in great harmony. Palate is lower in acid than some others at the table, but still very enjoyable. Quite structured and I bet it's a bit young but it has load of potential and is really enjoyable today. Very exotically spiced, I absolutely love it. (96 pts.)
  • 1996 Mongeard-Mugneret Bourgogne - France, Burgundy, Bourgogne
    (tasted blind - labelled I) I think it's safe to say this was the surprise of the night, this is the reason we taste blind. A measly 16 year old Bourgogne rouge that for many stole the show. I prefered a few others in the group more than this, but I really liked this wine a lot. Quite mature, many at the table thought it must be from the 80's, but at a very loveable stage of maturity and is truly in a great spot. With air a lovely coffee bean note emerged. Palate has some dusty tannins still in tact. If you have this there is no sense in waiting, it's ready to go and drinking so well! (94 pts.)
  • 1996 Georges Lignier et Fils Chambolle-Musigny - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Chambolle-Musigny
    (tasted blind - labelled J) Another awesome bottle, though I don't know if I was as enthusiastic as a few others at the table. Nose of ripe berries and sweat. Palate strikes a great balance and is fleshy. (93 pts.)


Tasting blind really helps to set aside biases. Many at the table have a hate on for Corton, but two Corton's really showed well on this evening. Also the lower leel 1996's really showed nicely as well. We also had a very consistent evening with everyone at the table scoring roughly 90 - 96 points for all wines. And yet another night of no wine with any obvious flaws. Life is good.
Posted from CellarTracker


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Posts: 675 | Location: Toronto, Ontario (Etobicoke) | Registered: Oct 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great Notes. That just goes to show, you cannot judge a book by it's cover or a pre- concieved notion about certain Varitals. Anything can go when Tasting Blind. Thank you all for the info.
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Clearlake Oaks, Ca | Registered: Feb 01, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Dave Canada:
I must say that it is tough tasting burgundy blind and i almost think that it is more informative to taste these wines non-blind as context is so important.


Curious. I know that Parker would say the same thing, but I always find it more informative to taste wines blind. If I were to have a poor showing from a Roumier or Ponsot in a non-blind setting, I would be more inclined to blame poor storage/provenance than an inferior product. Please expand on your comment when you get back. Based on posts from prior tastings, you have a lot more experience with higher end Burgundy than I. Smile


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Sometimes I read a thread and think we ran out of stuff to talk about like 4 years ago. ~spo
 
Posts: 2859 | Location: San Diego | Registered: Jan 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Dave Canada:
I must say that it is tough tasting burgundy blind and i almost think that it is more informative to taste these wines non-blind as context is so important.


That way you would know to like the Bourgogne less.
 
Posts: 8648 | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Red guy in a blue state:
quote:
Originally posted by Dave Canada:
I must say that it is tough tasting burgundy blind and i almost think that it is more informative to taste these wines non-blind as context is so important.


Curious. I know that Parker would say the same thing, but I always find it more informative to taste wines blind. If I were to have a poor showing from a Roumier or Ponsot in a non-blind setting, I would be more inclined to blame poor storage/provenance than an inferior product. Please expand on your comment when you get back. Based on posts from prior tastings, you have a lot more experience with higher end Burgundy than I. Smile


I agree with you...usually I like to taste blind but I guess what I meant to say is that I feel like I enjoy the wines of burgundy more when i know what the vineyard and commune's are as it allows me to imprint those characteristics on my brain.....
At this dinner, we tasted everything blind and then revealed it all at the end which made it tough to say..."ahh, so this is clos de beze, MSD, chambolle" etc. and then jusxtapose that against the other bottles as too much time had passed.
I agree...on principle blind tasting is always better but i feel like those in our group are OK to call a spade a spade and don't mind panning a Chambertin if it is off....or raving about a village wine. I was a huge fan of the Lignier. Just a gorgeous village wine.
So, bottom line, I agree with you on blind tasting but feel like sometimes I learn a bit more moving forward when I can compare and contrast bottles knowing what they are.

By the way....have been having some amazing dinners here in Vienna....look up Palais Coburg and Steireck. Simply amazing restaurants with great wine lists. Had a 2002 Dujac Morey St. Denis village a few days back and it was unreal.
 
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Thanks, makes sense. Enjoy your trip.


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Posts: 2859 | Location: San Diego | Registered: Jan 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From the same area : Bottle of Clos St Denis 1999 from Jadot opened last saturday. Great but missed a bit of roundness and persistence
 
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