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TN: 2005 Ch. Monbousquet
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Maybe? It's still very youthful and it does have tannin, so if you are averse to that that wait. But...if you like rich, smoky, earthy, concentrated, youthful delicious Bordeaux fruit then go for it!


So much wine.....so little time!!!
 
Posts: 7015 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Decided to compare the 2000 Monbousquet with the 2005 from 375's tonight hoping it would be a good excuse to try the 2005 for the first time. The differences were apparent right from the color of wine on the cork: 2000- dark as if charred by a match; 2005- medium light tinge that was opaque so you could still make out the vintage year. Interesting to see contrast side by side.

After a 2 hour decant

2000 Bright nose, much more so than the '05. Fine chewy tannins present but less prevalent and fading on the finish leaving an overall soft mouthfeel. Plum, dark cherry, some cedar. I think most of the younger fruit flavors have certainly matured from this wine since I encountered it for the first time a few years ago. Lovely balance. Ready to drink now and easily for another 10+.

2005 This baby was tightly wound as one would expect. Almost inky & charred on the nose. Dense and chewy mouthfeel with compact flavors (there's that char again) and fine tannins that prevail through the mid-palate and finish- really long and evolving/great finish. This wine is well balanced with a mineral/coal backbone and lurking fruit that became more prevalent after hour three, where the wine did begin to open up further revealing a promising future. Liking this. No rush. Should be singing in 3-5+. Is chirping now with long decant.


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
Posts: 1864 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Primordealsoup:
Decided to compare the 2000 Monbousquet with the 2005 from 375's tonight hoping it would be a good excuse to try the 2005 for the first time. The differences were apparent right from the color of wine on the cork: 2000- dark as if charred by a match; 2005- medium light tinge that was opaque so you could still make out the vintage year. Interesting to see contrast side by side.

After a 2 hour decant

2000 Bright nose, much more so than the '05. Fine chewy tannins present but less prevalent and fading on the finish leaving an overall soft mouthfeel. Plum, dark cherry, some cedar. I think most of the younger fruit flavors have certainly matured from this wine since I encountered it for the first time a few years ago. Lovely balance. Ready to drink now and easily for another 10+.

2005 This baby was tightly wound as one would expect. Almost inky & charred on the nose. Dense and chewy mouthfeel with compact flavors (there's that char again) and fine tannins that prevail through the mid-palate and finish- really long and evolving/great finish. This wine is well balanced with a mineral/coal backbone and lurking fruit that became more prevalent after hour three, where the wine did begin to open up further revealing a promising future. Liking this. No rush. Should be singing in 3-5+. Is chirping now with long decant.


Definitely one of the true deals of the 2005 vintage, IMO. Maybe because I bought a case of it. Time will tell, time will tell.
 
Posts: 1579 | Registered: May 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Felt it was time to pop something from 2005, and since the magnum happens to be on offer in the current LCBO Classics offer, and after popping a 2000 last week, thought it was time to open an 05 Monbousquet. Judging by CT and this thread, I opened a precocious bottle. After having the 2000 a few times recently, I had to double check the cork to make sure I didn't pull another 2000 by accident. Excellent from the moment that it was popped. Nose and palate were open for business, and remained so from the time the bottle was open to the last sip from what we poured a few hours later. Slightly less depth and weight than the 2000, and also not quite as dark, but flavour profile were the same. Have had the 99, 00, 01, 05, all were clearly monbousquet, but 00 and 05 are head and shoulders above the others. Not sure why this tasted so mature, but it was fragrant, rich yet soft and not heavy, balanced, had adequate length, no coffee notes, light red and blue fruit notes, some tasty cassis, a hint of cherry, a very small touch of smoke, soft tannins, and although it was a bit new worldly it was clearly bordeaux (right bank bordeaux, but still bordeaux). Saved about 40% of the bottle for tomorrow. I am not terribly experienced with older wine, but I must say that some flavours in this reminded me of the few bottles of 1982 la lagune that I have had. Wish I had more, and I don't really want to pay CAD$195 for a magnum, but I just might lean towards getting a few.


"No TV and no beer make Homer...something, something"
 
Posts: 2256 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Apr 07, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm interested to hear what you think of the leftovers tomorrow.
 
Posts: 1579 | Registered: May 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am sitting on three of these, but I guess I should not invite Board O to the tasting? Razz
 
Posts: 3643 | Location: Westchester, NY | Registered: Aug 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by jqmunro:
I'm interested to hear what you think of the leftovers tomorrow.


Nose was 85% of what it was on night one (still very good), but palate lost softness and complexity, maybe showed a bit more oak and some oxidation.


"No TV and no beer make Homer...something, something"
 
Posts: 2256 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Apr 07, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Machine:
quote:
Originally posted by jqmunro:
I'm interested to hear what you think of the leftovers tomorrow.


Nose was 85% of what it was on night one (still very good), but palate lost softness and complexity, maybe showed a bit more oak and some oxidation.


Oh well, that doesn't sound very promising. I would have thought the wine might be a little more expressive and hold up against oxidation. I guess time will tell...
 
Posts: 1579 | Registered: May 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by jqmunro:
quote:
Originally posted by Machine:
quote:
Originally posted by jqmunro:
I'm interested to hear what you think of the leftovers tomorrow.


Nose was 85% of what it was on night one (still very good), but palate lost softness and complexity, maybe showed a bit more oak and some oxidation.


Oh well, that doesn't sound very promising. I would have thought the wine might be a little more expressive and hold up against oxidation. I guess time will tell...


We actually found the same thing with the 2000 Monbousquet. I think we have had it 4 or 5 times now, every time it was great from the moment it was popped for about 90 minutes, then became more reserved with a more muted nose, and less complexity all around. Setting aside those that would not be a fan of the style of this wine when first opened, I suspect perhaps that some lower ratings for this wine might come from those that allowed it to decant for more than an hour or two. For us, we don't see this as a problem, as we know we can pop it before we intend on consuming and enjoy it over 90-120 minutes without caring what happens after that time. The 2005 went longer than the 2000 before it started to lose some complexity. Who knows, it might also go from expressive to 'closed' and 'open' back up later, i.e. if we had let it sit for even longer...or may have a longer period of being open and expressive with some more age on it.


"No TV and no beer make Homer...something, something"
 
Posts: 2256 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Apr 07, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I too love the 2005 Monbousquet, but this is a prime example of the modern age of wine.

Mediocre properties, revamped, and making the best wine possible off of a decent but not all that great site. While these wines may hold up for one or two decades in the bottle, they are not wines that "get better with age". They are meant to be accessible young, and for the modern palate and world market. Parker pleasers, and modern in style. They are what they are. There is a place for everything, but this is not a classic Bordeaux.


So much wine.....so little time!!!
 
Posts: 7015 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by dr.darkrichandbold:
I too love the 2005 Monbousquet, but this is a prime example of the modern age of wine.

Mediocre properties, revamped, and making the best wine possible off of a decent but not all that great site. While these wines may hold up for one or two decades in the bottle, they are not wines that "get better with age". They are meant to be accessible young, and for the modern palate and world market. Parker pleasers, and modern in style. They are what they are. There is a place for everything, but this is not a classic Bordeaux.


Fair enough. But, who wants to live forever?


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
Posts: 1864 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Decanted and began tasting after 3.5hrs. Loads of charcoal, graphite, & bitter herb from nose to finish. Gritty gripping tannins showing plenty of life. Paired with steak dinner and warm bread dipped in CA EVOO that cut the graphite nicely- a great complement. Warm dark fruit comes through mid-palate and carries into long evolving finish. Expressive & built for longer haul. This will outlast all previous vintages in the Perse era.


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
Posts: 1864 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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