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TN: 2005 Ch. Monbousquet
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I'm pretty sure I have read this thread before under a dozen different titles. Maybe the original post was different. Wink
 
Posts: 2410 | Location: Windsor, CA | Registered: Dec 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I really enjoyed the '98 Monbousquet about 6 months ago, I'm certainly no expert on gauging maturity but it tasted fantastic to me.
 
Posts: 1511 | Location: Vancouver | Registered: Feb 19, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Drab has made this point of try before you buy before and I think it’s valid in a perfect world. Problem is, we don’t live in a perfect world.


And, I totally agree. I'm saying, try before you buy when at all possible.

Obviously futures or pre-arrival is not a possibility. Or if something a local retailer only gets a case of and is going to be gone by the end of the day if you don't jump on it. By all means....

I'm just lost at those who buy 6 bottles of this and that (to cellar) simply because it gets a good review. If you're able to, and can afford it, you're doing yourself a disservice by not trying. I've been let down, and surprised many times by how a wine shows compared to the praise or demise of one critic. I'd rather have a cellar full of good surprises waiting because I did my homework.

And, I don't agree with the idea that a wine has nothing to give in it's youth. A good wine has a lot to show for itself. If all one tastes is tannin (ie: too much of one thing) then I would be cautious in hoping that something unbalanced will magically come into balance with bottle age. Again...caveat being that maybe a few people are ultrasensitive to tannin, and have a hard time with evaluating young wines because of this...but I have a hard time believing most, or the majority are in this boat.


So much wine.....so little time!!!
 
Posts: 7015 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Drab, I agree with your basic premise. If someone has no experience with a certain style of wine or wine region, it is not a smart move to buy a case for future consumption based solely on a score. But if you have plenty of experience with a style or region, I can see buying some bottles based on the notes from a reviewer that you trust. If I like Chilean cabs/blends and my favorite is the Don Melchor, but I see a good deal on the Almaviva or the Clos Apalta, I would buy a couple of bottles based on JM’s notes. Even if I haven’t tried them before. Like I said before, I would rather take the small chance that I’m unhappy with something in the future, than drink something I know is not showing its best now.

And I agree there is enjoyment in drinking certain wines young, but that is obviously personal preference.

Oh and Drab, just admit that part of you likes playing amateur wine critic and drinking wines young and posting TN’s on them. I’m not saying it’s a bad thing as I enjoy your notes, but it’s painfully obvious that is a big reason you do this, not just “try before you buy”. Come on man, just come out already. Razz
 
Posts: 6538 | Location: OC, CA  | Registered: Aug 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How many times have you tasted a wine in it's youth and determined that's something I want in my cellar and loaded up on it and then found 20 years down the road when you opened it you were sorely disappointed?


Joe
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Wine is like potato chips around me...if it's open, it's gone.

MyBlog @ www.wineismylife.net
 
Posts: 13602 | Location: Arlington, Texas | Registered: Aug 30, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by GlennK:
Oh and Drab, just admit that part of you likes playing amateur wine critic and drinking wines young and posting TN’s on them.


No need to admit the obvious.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36898 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by wineismylife:
How many times have you tasted a wine in it's youth and determined that's something I want in my cellar and loaded up on it and then found 20 years down the road when you opened it you were sorely disappointed?


Let's not exclude the converse either.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36898 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ok...

I cannot believe I'm actually taking time to do this, but there are at least three totally seperate reasons to drink wine "young" and people always get confused and conflate them when this topic comes up...

Try Before You Buy This works in at least four sub-ways. (1) While two wines may be very tight, one still might be better to you. It shouldn't be shocking to think that someone with a wealth of experience in wine can taste two wines from the same vintage and region next to one another and have a better-than-50%-shot at knowing which one he will prefer 10+ years down the road. (2) Someone with a tremendous amount of experience wth one winery, who has tracked that winery's wine's progessions may be able to tell a great deal about exactly how the wine will turn out based upon a taste of it young. (3) Tasting lots of wines young from one region and one vintage can give an overall impression of the vintage. So you can buy blind a different wine with more confidence on how it may age. (4) Once several bottles are already in your posession, you may want to try to figure out when to open them up. Tasting one can help. Suppose all the professional reviewers say the wine will be great starting in 2009; but you taste in 2008 and think the wine still closed down... DON'T open in the night you propose in 2009!

Intellectual Curiosity This works in at least 2 ways. (1) People starting out may want to see how wines age. The different stages. they may want to fully 'understand' wine. (2) More importantly, people may want to understand a specific wine. I've had enough wines from different vintages to know that not all wines age the same way every vintage, and to truly understand a wine I might feel that I want to know what it was like young, and as a "teenager" and in its thirties, and mid-life, older years, etc etc...

They Taste Good Again, at least two sub points. (1) Sometimes young wines just taste so damn good. The 2003 Montrose upon release was awesome. Better than the 1990 is right now. As good as the 1970 is. Would I hold it for 35 years to see what it is like then? Yes. Would I drink it upon release? Yes. Just because I think it will be a bit better in 35 years does not negate the fact that I also tink it will be different, and not to have tasted this awesome, unique, wine, in favor of having tasted it multiple times when its flavors were different is not a choice I would make. (2) Sh!t happens. As bottles get older imperfections come to the surface... you cannot return corked or damaged bottles... Plus, not all wines age the way people/professional reviewers think they will. What is the expression? A Bird in the fist is worth two in the air? If I've got a wine that I would rate 95 points for drinking right now, OR I could wait 15 years and *maybe* I would rate it 96 points, that is a tough sell. Maybe sometimes, or even most of the time, I might take the risk, but a lot of the time I would not take the risk. And from a purely rational economic standpoint, I'm pretty certain that in many cases people ought not to be taking that risk.


"What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?" -- W.C. Fields
 
Posts: 7639 | Registered: Dec 05, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh and Drab, just admit that part of you likes playing amateur wine critic and drinking wines young and posting TN’s on them. I’m not saying it’s a bad thing as I enjoy your notes, but it’s painfully obvious that is a big reason you do this, not just “try before you buy”. Come on man, just come out already.


Considering I don't get paid for it, and maybe 10 people read/comment on any of this, I'd have to say it's far more a hobby than an attempt at a side career.

If you look at my 5,000 post count compared to Board-O's 20,000 and we virtually started around the same time, I think you'll find the person looking for the amateur career! Wink


So much wine.....so little time!!!
 
Posts: 7015 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Let's have a show of hands. Who on this forum has been tasting wine for a minimum of 20 years so that they've had the ability to taste a wine throughout it's entire life cycle? I specifically want people that have been tasting wine for 20 years or more; not people that have gone back and tasted older vintages recently acquired or shared at offlines.

This is curiosity more than anything else.


Joe
-----
Wine is like potato chips around me...if it's open, it's gone.

MyBlog @ www.wineismylife.net
 
Posts: 13602 | Location: Arlington, Texas | Registered: Aug 30, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by wineismylife:
Let's have a show of hands. Who on this forum has been tasting wine for a minimum of 20 years so that they've had the ability to taste a wine throughout it's entire life cycle? I specifically want people that have been tasting wine for 20 years or more; not people that have gone back and tasted older vintages recently acquired or shared at offlines.

This is curiosity more than anything else.
20 years ago I was 11. So not me Big Grin
 
Posts: 6538 | Location: OC, CA  | Registered: Aug 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by wineismylife:
Let's have a show of hands. Who on this forum has been tasting wine for a minimum of 20 years so that they've had the ability to taste a wine throughout it's entire life cycle? I specifically want people that have been tasting wine for 20 years or more; not people that have gone back and tasted older vintages recently acquired or shared at offlines.

This is curiosity more than anything else.


Me. Smile
 
Posts: 30181 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I started actively learning about wine about 35 years ago and began avidly keeping notes and furiously collecting in February, 1978. At that time, I tasted many young wines, almost all Bordeaux and Burgundy. I quickly learned that drinking young red Burgundy was a mistake. With Bordeaux, the thin vintages of 1973 and 1974 were fine in their youth, mostly because they had no real future. The more concentrated vintages needed years of age to mellow, so I laid them down and bought older vintages to try. Back in 1978, the wines of 1975, 1970, 1966, 1962, 1961, 1959, 1955, 1953 (bad year for Latour), 1949, and even 1945 were not very expensive, certainly by today's standards. Our normal bottle of wine with dinner was a classified growth Bordeaux or Premier or Grand Cru Burgundy.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36898 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Board-O:
I started actively learning about wine about 35 years ago and began avidly keeping notes and furiously collecting in February, 1978. At that time, I tasted many young wines, almost all Bordeaux and Burgundy. I quickly learned that drinking young red Burgundy was a mistake. With Bordeaux, the thin vintages of 1973 and 1974 were fine in their youth, mostly because they had no real future. The more concentrated vintages needed years of age to mellow, so I laid them down and bought older vintages to try. Back in 1978, the wines of 1975, 1970, 1966, 1962, 1961, 1959, 1955, 1953 (bad year for Latour), 1949, and even 1945 were not very expensive, certainly by today's standards. Our normal bottle of wine with dinner was a classified growth Bordeaux or Premier or Grand Cru Burgundy.



I will not be too many more years, and you can hold up both hands. Wink Big Grin
 
Posts: 30181 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you can afford to buy six bottles of a potentially ageworthy red wine and elect to blow one early to satisfy yourself that you made a good choice (unclear if early drinking can do that) ... why not just buy 5 and donate the value of the sixth bottle to some worthy cause that will feed hungry people or solve some other problem.


I always wanted to be a procrastinator.
 
Posts: 607 | Location: Maryland | Registered: Mar 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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joe ,
if this help's i started enjoying wine in late 1971 when i was in the Marine Corp! greece,spain,
Nice ,France!
Cool
 
Posts: 3031 | Registered: Mar 12, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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1992 would be what I would say was 'serious'. 1988 and 89 Beaucastel are the two wines I've follwed from that point to now. I started having some 89 and 90 California and Bordeaux wines, but they didn't stick aorund long enough to say I've had them through out their life.


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7675 | Location: Gilroy, CA  | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush"


"Won't someone tell me what it is they all want?"
 
Posts: 6130 | Location: Utah | Registered: Jan 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is curiosity more than anything else.


Very true. Not exactly sure what it proves...other than to kick the door open for a big ego contest. And, Board-O loves knowing he's the winner here.

Maybe we should all get off the keyboard and go buy '82 1st growth Boardeaux, and '85 Grand Cru Red Burgundy (while we let our '90, '96, and '05's rest) so we can appropriately have a "normal" bottle of wine with dinner.


So much wine.....so little time!!!
 
Posts: 7015 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I haven't posted much in the last year or two, and I just had 2 beers and half a bottle of 1995 Concha y Toro Marquis de Casa Concha Cabernet Sauvignon. So, actually, I'm in a pretty good mood. Mountainman had it correct. Now I know why I don't post often. My first post ever was on the Oh Niagara Thread. This is following the same path (READ: mountain man previous post on this thread). A 1995 Monbousquet drunk at about 7 years was one of my top wines of all time. In a blind tasting when just recently released, this 1995 wine beat out several first growths and others to win the tasting. A google will find the review. I have it printed downstairs. If DRAB liked it, he liked it.... Period. I will continue to not post and just observe the constant bu*****t.
 
Posts: 886 | Location: Buffalo , New York | Registered: Jul 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Correction : 2005 Concha Y Toro Marquis de Casa Concha Cabernet Sauvignon. ( had that 1995 vintage on my brain)
 
Posts: 886 | Location: Buffalo , New York | Registered: Jul 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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WIML,

Just re-read my first post of the evening. A bit harsh (bad week). Anyway. Been at it 26 years. Have found I really like cabs/ blends at about the 6-8 year mark. I do not but First growths or equivalents. But have had many, many at levels a notch or two below from all around the world. Have found at that point they are beyond the effusive fruity phase, beyond the somewhat dumb phase, and have re-opened but not dried out. generalization??? sure. But works for me.
 
Posts: 886 | Location: Buffalo , New York | Registered: Jul 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends. . .


"Champagne for all my real friends, real pain for all my sham friends. . ." Tom Waits
 
Posts: 374 | Location: Yountville, California | Registered: Apr 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wow....I forgot how "involved" this thread got!

In any case....I had the '05 Monbousquet again last night, and I must say...it is delicious. A great blend of old and new world Bordeaux. Great deep, dark fruit backed up with fresh acidity, and a toasty, moderately tannic spine. I think this will be best now and through the next 15 years. Good stuff. 94 pts.


So much wine.....so little time!!!
 
Posts: 7015 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm looking forward to opening some of my stash. I have been hesitant on all my '05's due to strong tannins, etc... Maybe I will open a 375 before a 750. I enjoy Monbousquet very much. The 2000 is fantastic and the 1999 has been drinking well this year. Time to crack and decant?


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
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