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'Round-the-world Grenache Tasting
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As is becoming an annual event, the Denver crew got together for a blind tasting of a mix of old-world and new-world Rhone varietals – this year, Grenache. As is common with Grenache, most were blends of some sort, and one, the 2007 Saxum James Berry, had only 41% Grenache, yet it is still the primary component of the wine. I also wanted to compare two wines from Sine Qua Non from the same vintage, one ‘regular,’ one ‘Estate.’ (Manfred Krankl has been distancing himself from the designation ‘Extended Barrel Aged,’ as he has expressed that he wouldn’t hesitate to decrease the barrel aging on any future wine, if he thought it would be appropriate for that, given wine.)

The wines received anywhere from 2 hours decanting to 5+, depending on the wine, and I wanted them to still be opening (i.e., ‘on the way up’) during the tasting. I think I was pretty close on all but the 2004 Montsant Espectacle. Each wine got its own glass, allowing the tasters to move with absolute freedom between the wines. They were tasted single-blind to me; to everyone else, they began knowing only that they were all Grenache-based; then everyone learned the wines included, but not which glass; then we did the complete reveal.

Wine #1: Clearly an ‘old-school’ nose, full of earth and wool. Lightest color by far – rather transparent, in fact. Palate is wonderfully plush and well-rounded with ample blackberry and raspberry fruits, also just a hint of briariness, but the feature here is a sexy spiciness, creating an overall impression that is simultaneously delicate and voluptuous, like a ballerina with curves. Also a true chameleon with the food. Definitely outstanding, perhaps border-line classic. Guys with old-world palates (like Sandy Fitzgerald and pilot360) liked it even more than I. I think we all figured this one out: 1998 Clos des Papes CdP

Wine #2: I got lots of clay on the nose, which made me think it was the Montsant. The palate was fairly soft, but oddly a bit hollow in the mid-palate. Overall a very good wine that simply didn’t get much attention, due to the company on the table; maybe border-line outstanding. I guessed wrong, but RonBurgundy got it right: 2004 Torbreck Les Amis

Wine #3: Started out tight, but opened up to a nice balance of new- and old-world characteristics. Fairly dense black fruits and an exceedingly long, saturating finish. The nose was not nearly as explosive or as impressive as the palate, but this wine seems to be at the beginning of a very promising future. I loved it; classic IMO. In the end, it was clear that this had more in common with #1 than anything else on the table. I think Jeb Dunnuck called it first, and we all came to agree before revealing the wine: 2003 Pégaü, CdP Cuvée Réservée

Wine #4: From the outset, this seemed to be the star of the evening to me. A gorgeous nose of raspberry cobbler, kirsch, anise, and subtle herbs lead to a palate that is smooth and harmonious, reflecting the nose and adding a notion of grilled meat and pepper. Clearly new-world, but remarkably agile on the palate for the volume of the fruit. Even old-world lovers like Sandy Fitzgerald seemed to be won over by this. A complete package that is ready to drink now, but should age effortlessly at least for the mid-term. Way classic, IMHO, and it seemed to be a consensus WOTN, though some mentioned it wasn’t as good with the food; I thought it was great with my flank steak. I guessed correctly, but some others were thrown off by the statistics (despite spending 32 months in oak, this wine shows very little evidence of it): 2006 Sine Qua Non Grenache In the Crosshairs

Wine #5: This wine seemed enigmatic in every way to me. Very-tightly wound, but not overly tannic. Nose was completely reticent. All I can say is let it sit a long time, and see. I was afraid this might be a shut-down Saxum or a dead Les Amis, since I was convinced #2 was the Spanish wine; either way, I was wrong: 2004 Montsant Espectacle

Wine #6: Gorgeous, open nose with lifted dark fruits, reflected as well on the palate. Fairly complex with a nice balance of berry, grilled meat, and subtle pepper on the palate that show nice delineation, yet the overall impression is well harmonized. Easily classic IMHO. I had tasted this wine six months ago, and I was certain: 2006 Sine Qua Non Grenache The Raven

Wine #7: To my nose and palate, this was the biggest, densest wine of the evening, with powerful blackberry, anise, pepper, and hints of smoke and chocolate. Remarkably, the wine avoids feeling heavy on the palate. Not quite as well delineated as #6, but there’s no doubt that there’s more ‘stuffing’ here. Way classic, IMHO. This welcomed lots of swirling, and it evolved positively the whole evening. Undoubtedly promising for the long haul, yet it’s so delicious now: 2007 Saxum James Berry Vineyard

We started the evening with the 2007 Brewer-Clifton Chardonnay Mount Carmel, which I think shows the best aspects of the new wave of less-oaked CA Chards: great, dense fruit, but ample mineral with a hint of funk - outstanding. We followed up the tasting with Chambers’ NV Rare Muscadelle. Despite the love these get from critics, I can’t help feeling that they’re dramatically under-appreciated by most wine lovers. Fantastic coffee, fig, maple and vanilla flavors accompany chocolate like no other dessert wine I know – even better than tawny port! Even davec, who professes not to like dessert wines, thought it was pretty good! This bottle wasn’t quite as dense or complex as a bottle I had four years ago, but it was still classic IMO!

Thanks to all who attended. I simply must say it again: I feel fortunate and blessed to have such a fantastic group of wine lovers with whom to enjoy this past-time! Egos and attitudes are never a problem, which allows the joy in this pursuit to be unfettered. Thank you, gentlemen.


De gustibus non est disputandum.
 
Posts: 3945 | Location: Denver, CO | Registered: Jan 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice!

Just curious, but what does it mean when you guys "guess correctly"? For example, you mentioned that you all figured out #1 and #3.

Does this mean that your group came to a consensus that #1 was the 2001 Clos de Papes and #3 was the 2003 Domaine du Pegau. Or does it mean that you guessed the producer, or guessed CdP, or whatever.
 
Posts: 1217 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We began tasting, knowing only that the predominant grape in each wine was Grenache (except for me, since I provided the wines). After we got as unbiased a read on the wines as possible, I passed out a list of what wines were in the line-up, and that's when we began guessing (fwiw, I did not know the order of the lineup). The first wine stood out as being the most mature and easily had the most old-world nose, thus it wasn't hard to ascertain (assuming that you know that the Pégaü is going to be a little more modern and high-octane, especially in 2003) that #1 was the '98 Clos des Papes, so we were guessing the exact wine from a list in each case. The tasters were fairly savvy Rhone-lovers, so the indication of guessing correctly is probably more about the wine performing as expected than anything else. 'Hope that makes sense.


De gustibus non est disputandum.
 
Posts: 3945 | Location: Denver, CO | Registered: Jan 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This was a very good and interesting tasting, and I must praise Stickman for his generosity. I am a Cab drinker by preference, and have gone so far as DC to attend a To Kalon Cab tasting.

One would not usually waste such good wines on me, but Stickman did none the less. My initial tasting notes were more of guessing location.

I originally placed the wines as French, new world, French, Cal, unknown, new world, unknown. When I saw the list, I guessed #1 - '98 Clos Des Pape because of the nose, and #4 & #6 - SQN because they tasted like wines Manfred would create. #4 was my favorite by itself with #6 second. With dinner, my favorites changed to #3 and #5.

I had to remind Stickman and the rest of the group that there was little chance that I could provide a similar tasting at my house, except with maybe 2 or 3 bottles. (All Cabs.)

And Stickman was right about the sticky. I do have some Ports that I like, but I haven't had many non Portuguese desert wines that I have liked. I would buy some Chambers’ NV Rare Muscadelle if I could find it and afford it.

Thank you again Stickman for such a wonderful evening.

P.S. Stickman is wrong about the attitudes. Someone in the group likes Pinot, and I'm not even sure what kind of liquid it is.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: davec,
 
Posts: 390 | Location: Denver, CO | Registered: Aug 17, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by stickman:
We began tasting, knowing only that the predominant grape in each wine was Grenache (except for me, since I provided the wines). After we got as unbiased a read on the wines as possible, I passed out a list of what wines were in the line-up, and that's when we began guessing (fwiw, I did not know the order of the lineup). The first wine stood out as being the most mature and easily had the most old-world nose, thus it wasn't hard to ascertain (assuming that you know that the Pégaü is going to be a little more modern and high-octane, especially in 2003) that #1 was the '98 Clos des Papes, so we were guessing the exact wine from a list in each case. The tasters were fairly savvy Rhone-lovers, so the indication of guessing correctly is probably more about the wine performing as expected than anything else. 'Hope that makes sense.


Perfectly. Thanks for sharing your experiences!
 
Posts: 1217 | Location: San Francisco | Registered: Jun 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think Stickman provided a pretty spot on description of the wines. To me, both SQN were beyond outstanding. The Raven was a *little* more reserved than In The Crosshairs, but still a complete wine. The Pegau was my third favorite. It was a lighter than the wines that followed it. It had beautiful blue and black fruits and tanned leather and garrigue components. A beautiful wine. The Papes was nice, but it definitely was more developed and tertiary than any of the others. The Saxum was exceptionally dense with a beautiful nose and shows great potential, but currently is a bit to hot, astringent and shall we say full of itself. Needs time to shed some baby fat. I'd love to retaste in 5-10 years. The Espectacle was full of lavendar soap, lilacs and light fruit. Odd duck. Finally, the Les Amis stood out to me as Torbreck even before I knew what the lineup included because of the heavy does of VA and prunes. It was my least favorite. Overall, the night was highly enjoyable and many thanks must go to Stickman for his generosity!


ITB
personal blog: www.coloradowinepress.com
 
Posts: 248 | Location: Littleton, CO | Registered: Aug 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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What a wonderful evening! Smile

Stickman hit the notes right on. The "In the Crosshairs", I defined as the complete package, everything in complete harmony and balance. It stood out over the rest of a wonderful lineup. The Clos des Papes just kept opening up all night, and I was begging for more at the end of the evening. This wine has years to go.

The Saxon is a baby. Put it away and hide it for another 5 years. This wine has everything it needs to be a true classic in a few years, but it still needs to lose the baby fat.

I set wine #5 out of the line-up early on and quit tasting it until the very end. It never opened up. I believe this wine is in a dumb phase now and down for a nice long slumber. When it awakens, it has all the stuffing to really sing.

Mega Thanks to Stickman for an incredible evening.
Winner

To Davec; I resemble that pinot comment! Big Grin
 
Posts: 1887 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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